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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Grain growers urged to "future proof" machinery investment Grain growers are encouraged to "future proof" their farm machinery investment by factoring into their equipment purchasing decision-making the expected evolution of agricultural technology and the capabilities of currently available machinery... The advice comes from central New South Wales primary producer and Nuffield Scholar James Hassall who has studied the future role of precision agriculture (PA) and the new technologies being developed to enhance PA. Mr Hassall says the development of new PA electronic equipment has allowed growers to increase the efficiency of their operations and develop new farming practices the technology can become superseded relatively quickly and does not tend to hold its capital value... Speaking at recent Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) technical research Updates in the southern cropping region, Mr Hassall gave growers an insight into the future of agricultural technology and what it means for machinery currently in use...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Grain growers urged to "future proof" machinery investment.. Grain growers urged to "future proof" machinery investment Grain growers are encouraged to "future proof" their farm machinery investment by factoring into their equipment purchasing decision-making the expected evolution of agricultural technology and the capabilities of currently available machinery... The advice comes from central New South Wales primary producer and Nuffield Scholar James Hassall who has studied the future role of precision agriculture (PA) and the new technologies being developed to enhance PA. Mr Hassall says the development of new PA electronic equipment has allowed growers to increase the efficiency of their operations and develop new farming practices the technology can become superseded relatively quickly and does not tend to hold its capital value...
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Catalogue: Nuffield Scholar Reports
Research into the control systems required to make this work is underway including research being conducted at the University of Kentucky by PhD student.. Currently the standard practice for no-till farming systems is to control weeds by applying a uniform rate of herbicide across a field; the chemicals used and application rate determined by the weed species which is the hardest to control... The system is based around a single pair of wires called a "BUS" to which all the computers are connected...
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