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blackleg

Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Previous research conducted at Horsham has found that canola plants infected after the third to fifth leaf stage did not result in the formation of a stem canker... The aim of the work was to investigate the use of foliar fungicides on canola seedlings as an alternative or in addition to the application of a seed dressing for blackleg control in areas of high disease pressure... Results from the field experiments suggest that the addition of a seed dressing and the application of a foliar fungicide gave the best protection...
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Catalogue: NVT Online Papers
Choose a cultivar with adequate blackleg resistance for your region... For individual site results consult the NVTonline website... Background: Blackleg disease can be minimised by a number of factors including sowing cultivars with high blackleg resistance, avoiding sowing in close proximity to last year's stubble and applying fungicides (see the current Blackleg Management Guide for details www.grdc.com.au)...
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Catalogue: NVT Online Papers
Choose a cultivar with adequate blackleg resistance for your region... For individual site results consult the NVTonline website... Background: Blackleg disease can be minimised by a number of factors including sowing cultivars with high blackleg resistance, avoid sowing canola in close proximity to last year's stubble and applying fungicides (see the current Blackleg Management Guide for details - www.grdc.com.au)...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Blackleg: developing a prioritised management strategy.. Newly deployed novel sources of resistance remain effective for a number of years before virulent blackleg isolates increase in frequency to a level where significant disease results... We can use the fungal life traits to manipulate the fungal population...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
DAFWA researcher Ravjit Khangura standing in a field of canola... Dr Khangura said the main control tactic was to reduce the frequency of host species, such as canola and lupins, and it was recommended growers avoid planting canola on paddocks with high sclerotinia levels during the past three years... "Previous research in WA's northern cropping region has shown that applying a single fungicide spray is often effective in reducing canola yield losses from sclerotinia when the crop is at the 15 to 30 per cent flowering stage (coinciding with the onset of spore release) and conditions are conducive to disease," she said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Assess blackleg risk to canola yields before spraying crops.. Assess blackleg risk to canola yields before spraying crops Canola growers in the southern cropping region must determine the potential for significant yield losses caused by blackleg infection before investing in and applying post-emergent treatments... Key points contained in the fact sheet include: "It is important for growers to monitor crops each season so they know the extent of blackleg infection and can make more informed management decisions," Dr Marcroft said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Assess blackleg risk to canola yields before spraying crops Canola growers in the southern cropping region must determine the potential for significant yield losses caused by blackleg infection before investing in and applying post-emergent treatments... Growers need to be confident that they will incur significant yield losses before investing in this form of control," Dr Marcroft said. ".. Key points contained in the fact sheet include: "It is important for growers to monitor crops each season so they know the extent of blackleg infection and can make more informed management decisions," Dr Marcroft said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Leg-up for canola growers in minimising the risk of blackleg Growers are being equipped with an important tool in their quest to minimise the risk of blackleg - the most damaging disease of canola and juncea-canola in Australia... Industry experts and the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) have developed a Risk Assessor to help growers make the right choices prior to or at sowing this coming season in order to reduce the risk of blackleg... Growers are encouraged to use the Risk Assessor to determine if a paddock presents a high risk situation and what practices can be changed to reduce yield loss caused by blackleg...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Canola growers can reduce potential yield losses and the probability of blackleg disease resistance breakdown occurring by changing cultivars every three years... That's according to blackleg authority Steve Marcroft who says sowing the same cultivar every year is likely to break the cultivar's resistance to blackleg - the most severe disease of canola in Australia... Speaking at recent Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) grains research Updates throughout the southern cropping region, Dr Marcroft has told growers and advisers that every year a cultivar is sown from the same resistance group, the number of virulent isolates that can attack that particular cultivar increases...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
The Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC), with the support of industry authorities, local agronomists and farming groups, is advising lower EP growers to be aware of the risks of sowing the canola cultivar Hyola 50 due to high levels of blackleg infection in this cultivar within the lower EP region in 2011... Dr Marcroft says because Hyola 50 has been grown extensively on the lower EP, an even higher level of disease severity could occur this year if the cultivar's resistance is overcome by the blackleg fungus... In summary, the measures that should be taken include: 1/ Choose a canola cultivar with high levels of blackleg resistance for the Eyre Peninsula noting varieties with recent resistance changes (use only the current year's ratings)...
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