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trace element

Catalogue: GRDC Updates
I do believe that we need to develop farming systems which cycle P more efficiently... Both Zn and Cu will remain available to crops and pastures for long periods (up to 10 years for Zn and up to 40 years for Cu) following a recommended rate of application to soil... Due to the increased complexity of management in our current cropping systems and increased costs of fertilisers, there is a greater need for crop monitoring to help make informed nutritional decisions...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Select the best when saving seed for next years crops.. "Avoiding deficiencies early can help plants fight off the ravages of rhizoctonia and I think that's a real benefit of getting seed that's rich in Mn and Zn," he said. ".. "Another solution is to boost the nutrient levels of seeds in home-grown crops with a very late application of trace elements to the crop, in particular manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn)."..
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Seeds from crops grown on more fertile soils should also be targeted, according to South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI) research leader Dr Nigel Wilhelm, whose research is supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC)... "Avoiding deficiencies early can help plants fight off the ravages of rhizoctonia and I think that's a real benefit of getting seed that's rich in Mn and Zn," he said. ".. "Another solution is to boost the nutrient levels of seeds in home-grown crops with a very late application of trace elements to the crop, in particular manganese (Mn) and zinc (Zn)."..
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Catalogue: Nuffield Scholar Reports
The aim of the report is to educate the reader as to the importance of TE"s, how to apply them, and to then generate discussion around the use of them more widely within agriculture ix and the food industry... Evan Ryan RYANAGPTYLTD 0428 298 031 03 5744 3662 ev_ryan@hotmail.com To assess the importance of trace elements in broadacre farming and to study methods to manage their application and benefits Currently few Australian broadacre farmers are using trace elements to increase their productivity and profitability Travel across North America and Europe interviewing farmers, researchers and advisors who use and recommend trace elements Trace elements are important both to plant growth and to human health... Trace element use can improve productivity and profitability for farmers and improve health outcomes for consumers...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
The workshop on April 13 will provide information and technical advice, with scientific support, for determining organic matter cycling in the soil in relation to nitrogen nutrition, paddock planning and fertiliser rates, plus trace element identification and management... Speakers at the Murray Bridge workshop will include Dr Rob Norton, Australia and New Zealand Regional Director with the International Plant Nutrition Institute; CSIRO soil scientist Dr Jeff Baldock; Dr Glenn McDonald from the University of Adelaide; Tony Cox and Dr Ehsan Tavakkoli from the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries; Dr John Angus from Charles Sturt University and CSIRO; and Dr Nigel Wilhelm of the South Australian Research and Development Institute... More information about the workshop, including registration details, can be found at www.agcommunicators.com.au ...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
The workshop on April 13 will provide information and technical advice, with scientific support, for determining organic matter cycling in the soil in relation to nitrogen nutrition, paddock planning and fertiliser rates, plus trace element identification and management... Speakers at the Murray Bridge workshop will include Dr Rob Norton, Australia and New Zealand Regional Director with the International Plant Nutrition Institute; CSIRO soil scientist Dr Jeff Baldock; Dr Glenn McDonald from the University of Adelaide; Tony Cox and Dr Ehsan Tavakkoli from the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries; Dr John Angus from Charles Sturt University and CSIRO; and Dr Nigel Wilhelm of the South Australian Research and Development Institute... More information about the workshop, including registration details, can be found at www.agcommunicators.com.au ...
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Catalogue: GRDC YouTube channel
65.63: Maarten Ryder: Now we 69.11: mix those together in the liquid form or keep the rhizobia together with trace element on 76.689: the seed and then coat the rhizobia onto that... 102.74: Narrator: And the reason for not mixing metals with 105.179: inoculants is because rhizobia are sensitive and high concentrates of elements such as 110.549: Zinc or Copper can be toxic to the rhizobia... 113.609: Maarten Ryder: For example some of these treatments are actually 118.549: an acid pH so if we mix together a liquid that is acid even though we 124.149: add zinc and copper but if that liquid is acid the rhizobia will die off quite quickly 130.21: possibly because of the acidic conditions as well...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Growers can give themselves a head start for next season by adhering to some basic practices when it comes to retaining seed from this year's harvest... For growers with varying soil types across their farm, he said the seeds they keep for next year need to come from crops that were grown on more fertile soils... "Seed dressing would mean the retained seed would end up with a richer supply of nutrients for germinating seed, but the late spray is something that growers can get out of the way early and not worry about the following year - the seed is treated and can be stored easily," Dr Wilhelm said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Growers can give themselves a head start for next season by adhering to some basic practices when it comes to retaining seed from this year's harvest... For growers with varying soil types across their farm, he said the seeds they keep for next year need to come from crops that were grown on more fertile soils... "Seed dressing would mean the retained seed would end up with a richer supply of nutrients for germinating seed, but the late spray is something that growers can get out of the way early and not worry about the following year - the seed is treated and can be stored easily," Dr Wilhelm said...
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Catalogue: GRDC 2014 Research Summaries
The Northern Grains Region broadly consists of soils with inherently high fertility and water holding capacity... Possible reasons for the difference between achieved and potential grain yield have often been reported individually but rarely collectively and never specifically allocated to particular management practices... This project aims to determine the maximum attainable (potential) grain yield (wheat and sorghum) for a given year at two core nodes across the NSW component of the Northern Grains Region; Trangie (CW NSW) and the Liverpool Plains (NNSW)...
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