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crown rot infection

Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Over the three survey years this allowed 307 comparisons of Fusarium DNA levels assessed at sowing using PreDicta B with the actual incidence of infection that developed by harvest as determined from laboratory plating (Table 1)... The predicted risk of crown rot development at sowing using PreDicta B was within one category of the actual level of infection measured after harvest in 121 paddocks (39%, light grey shading)... In other regions a shallower sampling depth (0-10 cm or 0-15 cm) is recommended with PreDicta B. In 2013 we aimed to determine if this deeper sampling depth in the northern region, to account for RLN populations deeper in the soil profile, is potentially compromising the accuracy of PreDicta B to measure levels of other soil-borne pathogens including Fusarium ...
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
Nematodes reduce yields in intolerant wheat cultivars Nematodes reduce the amount of water available for plant growth Nematodes impose early stress that reduces yield potential despite the availability of water and nutrients Maintaining a low nematode population improves crop yields.. Overall, populations increased five times compared to before planting the summer crops, but remained below 250/kg soil (Figure 4)... Data is presented as an average of the added CR and no added CR treatments for this site...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Three top tips to stop crown rot: rotate crops, observe plants for browning at the base of tillers and test stubble and soil... Reducing the risk before planting Reducing inoculum levels is vital to managing crown rot... Do this by visually assessing crown rot levels in a prior cereal crop or have soil/stubble samples analysed by PreDicta B . If crown rot has been identified as a risk in a paddock, there are a number of ways to minimise the risk for the coming season...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Adapting our current practices and varieties to focus on managing the three key phases of crown rot (survival, infection and yield loss) will determine the impact this disease has on your crops in the future... Yield achievement in the presence of crown rot (Figure 2) is perhaps a more useful means of comparing varieties rather than the extent of yield loss associated with infection (Figure 1) as a variety with the smallest yield loss may not always be the highest yield achiever... The agronomy of durum production has not been extensively evaluated in such a western environment due to limited commercial production in the region primarily based around concerns over the high susceptibility of this crop to crown rot...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
New research results have given grain growers hope that partial resistance to the damaging disease crown rot may be around the corner for durum wheat... The figures are reported in the GRDC publication, The Current and Potential Costs from Diseases of Wheat in Australia , which also details estimates that if current control measures weren't in place crown rot would cost the industry $36.44/ha or $434 million per year... Dr Steven Simpfendorfer, NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI), Tamworth plant pathologist says a GRDC-supported research project demonstrated that partial crown rot resistance present in hexaploid wheat lines could be transferred into durum wheats...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Three top tips to stop crown rot: rotate crops, observe plants for browning at the base of tillers and test stubble and soil... Reducing the risk before planting Reducing inoculum is vital to managing crown rot... Unfortunately cultivation spreads infected residues, which may increase plant infection rates counteracting any benefits from increased residue breakdown...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
A replicated field trial examining crown rot tolerance in different wheat and barley varieties at Tamworth, NSW. Note the white heads caused by crown rot in plots across this 2014 trial... Trials at the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) in 2013 and 2014 showed that some new bread wheat varieties produce higher yields in the presence of crown rot infection than the more popular wheat variety EGA Gregory ... "Crop and variety choice is not the sole solution to crown rot, but rather just one element of an integrated management strategy to limit losses from this disease."..
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
A replicated field trial examining crown rot tolerance in different wheat and barley varieties at Tamworth, NSW. Note the white heads caused by crown rot in plots across this 2014 trial... Trials at the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) in 2013 and 2014 showed that some new bread wheat varieties produce higher yields in the presence of crown rot infection than the more popular wheat variety EGA Gregory ... "Crop and variety choice is not the sole solution to crown rot, but rather just one element of an integrated management strategy to limit losses from this disease."..
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Researchers go head to head to tackle crown rot.. Australia's leading crop geneticists and disease researchers are going 'head to head' in a race to identify new germplasm that will allow cereal crops to yield well under crown rot pressure... A combination of technologies is being applied to rapidly move genes (from multiple sources) into bread wheat, including: 'speed breeding', (aimed at reducing the time taken from sowing to harvest to 12 weeks); high-throughput seedling and nursery screens to allow large population sizes to be evaluated for crown rot reaction; and use of advance molecular genetics tools to identify gene segments that contribute to crown rot resistance and/or tolerance...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Researchers go head to head to tackle crown rot.. Australia's leading crop geneticists and disease researchers are going 'head to head' in a race to identify new germplasm that will allow cereal crops to yield well under crown rot pressure... A combination of technologies is being applied to rapidly move genes (from multiple sources) into bread wheat, including: 'speed breeding', (aimed at reducing the time taken from sowing to harvest to 12 weeks); high-throughput seedling and nursery screens to allow large population sizes to be evaluated for crown rot reaction; and use of advance molecular genetics tools to identify gene segments that contribute to crown rot resistance and/or tolerance...
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