You are here

durable rust resistance

Categorised under:

Catalogue: GRDC 2014 Research Summaries
Cereal rust diseases cause significant losses in Australia... Efforts to develop high yielding cereal cultivars with resistance to rust diseases have often been thwarted by the ability of rust pathogens to overcome these genes... The detection of 10 new pathotypes of cereal rust pathogens, resulting in the loss of 5 resistance genes from 2007-2011 highlight the need for ongoing R&D to underpin resistance breeding efforts and ensure industry-wide rust protection...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Media
Professor Robert Park, the David and Judith Coffey Chair in Sustainable Agriculture at the University of Sydney, has won a New South Wales Science and Engineering Award... Professor Park, who is also director of the Grains Research and Development Corporation-funded Australian Cereal Rust Control Program (ACRCP), was presented with the Excellence in Biological Sciences category award for his major contribution to the global effort to fight diseases that infect agricultural crops... Professor Park joined the University of Sydney's Plant Breeding Institute in 1988 and has since worked there as a world leader in seeking genetic solutions to rust control in cereals...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Media
Professor Park, who is also director of the Grains Research and Development Corporation-funded Australian Cereal Rust Control Program (ACRCP), was presented with the Excellence in Biological Sciences category award for his major contribution to the global effort to fight diseases that infect agricultural crops... Professor Park joined the University of Sydney's Plant Breeding Institute in 1988 and has since worked there as a world leader in seeking genetic solutions to rust control in cereals... His research group has developed DNA-based markers that have allowed them to test hypotheses on how rust pathogen populations have evolved in Australia over the past 90 years, and is now decoding the genomes of these pathogens to develop a deeper understanding of how they infect and destroy cereal crops...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Researchers are playing catch-up to fix the "gaping hole" in Australia's armoury against rust... Dr Hugh Wallwork of the CRC for Molecular Plant Breeding Talks about the long-term catch-up game researchers are playing to build durable rust resistance, and the cooperation needed from Australia's graingrowers in the accelerated research effort... Keep browsing 0 Responses to New front in battle against rust..
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
Studies within the project have shown that some of the newly identified slow rusting genes have pleiotropic effects on multiple diseases... In the first phase of this project, this partnership led to the cloning of the first adult plant resistance gene, Lr34/Yr18/Pm38 and the development of a gene-based molecular marker that is routinely being used by many breeding programs worldwide... In 2012, Australian wheat, durum and triticale varieties were also evaluated for stripe rust, as well as for leaf rust in Mexico with prevalent races that constitute an important threat to wheat production if introduced to Australia...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
The project will generate tools that allow the delivery of durable resistance to rust diseases in the Australian wheat crop through: 1... In the shorter term accurate DNA markers referred to as 'Breeders' Markers' and newly characterised resistance genes will be made available for immediate use by Australian wheat breeders as soon as they are verified and then internationally via peer reviewed publication in scientific journals... The expected outputs of this project are a set of accurate DNA makers for known and new rust resistance genes of high relevance to controlling the three wheat rust species (stem rust, stripe rust and leaf rust) in Australia and overseas...
Related categories: