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chickpea wheat rotation

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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Data from the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) long-term rotation experiments in northern NSW showed a positive effect of no-tillage on productivity and N2 fixation of chickpea (Felton et al. 1998; Marcellos et al. 1998; Herridge et al. 1998)... The difference between N2 fixation of chickpea and fababean is highlighted in Table 2, using data from the NSW DPI long-term rotation experiments and commercial crops in northern NSW... One of the objectives of the long-term no-tillage experiments of NSW DPI (Felton et al. 1998) was to compare chickpea and fababean in terms of N2 fixation and rotational benefits...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Can wild chickpeas reduce the nematode problem in Australian crops.. A new international collaboration between Australia, the United States and Turkey is seeking to tap into the genetic potential of wild chickpea to create more resilient and nutritious varieties... For the Australian contribution to the project, researchers will be specifically interested in the genetic resistance of wild chickpea to the root-lesion nematode (RLN), a microscopic worm that feeds on and damages the roots of susceptible crop hosts, like chickpea and wheat, limiting the plant's ability to access soil water and nutrients, thereby stunting it growth and reducing yield...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Can wild chickpeas reduce the nematode problem in Australian crops.. A new international collaboration between Australia, the United States and Turkey is seeking to tap into the genetic potential of wild chickpea to create more resilient and nutritious varieties... For the Australian contribution to the project, researchers will be specifically interested in the genetic resistance of wild chickpea to the root-lesion nematode (RLN), a microscopic worm that feeds on and damages the roots of susceptible crop hosts, like chickpea and wheat, limiting the plant's ability to access soil water and nutrients, thereby stunting it growth and reducing yield...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Trials show that chickpeas, such as this crop at Emerald, Central Queensland, have the potential to lift yields in subsequent wheat crops... Trials of chickpea/wheat rotations in the Central Queensland grain-growing region show that using chickpeas as a break crop could help growers increase yields, protein levels and profitability in subsequent wheat crops... Results for a trial at 'Wongalee', near Theodore, CQ, showed a huge increase in both the yield and protein content of wheat grown after chickpeas. "..
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Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
The Central Queensland (CQ) region, including the Central Highlands and Dawson/Callide subregions, is home to some 400 grain growers... The CQ production environment is characterised by a summer dominant extremely variable and often marginal rainfall... It has long been recognized that introduction of legumes and ley phases into cropping sequences are an important means by which long-term improvements in soil fertility can be achieved in CQ...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Nitrogen fixation activity of legumes is strongly linked to productivity and suppressed by soil nitrate... Data from the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) long-term rotation experiments in northern NSW showed a positive effect of no-tillage on productivity and N2 fixation of both chickpea and fababean (Felton et al. 1998; Marcellos et al. 1998; Herridge et al. 1998)... Nitrate levels for Year 2 are after a 6-month summer fallow and for Year 3 are after an 18-month summer-winter-summer fallow (source: unpublished data of W. Felton, H. Marcellos, D. Herridge, G. Schwenke and M. Peoples)..
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (North)
With the X-ray method we can also estimate the soil density, and this shows us that roots grow preferentially in looser parts of the soil... Benefit of work to farmers Our trial results show that, using N fertiliser, the yields experienced when cropping newlycleared land can be maintained on soils that have lost significant amounts of soil organic matter... Sowing rule is not critical, but a rule of 50-70cm of wet soil for wheat and 70-90cm of wet soil for sorghum is suggested...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (South)
With the X-ray method we can also estimate the soil density, and this shows us that roots grow preferentially in looser parts of the soil... Benefit of work to farmers Our trial results show that, using N fertiliser, the yields experienced when cropping newlycleared land can be maintained on soils that have lost significant amounts of soil organic matter... Sowing rule is not critical, but a rule of 50-70cm of wet soil for wheat and 70-90cm of wet soil for sorghum is suggested...
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