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blackleg in canola

Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Previous research conducted at Horsham has found that canola plants infected after the third to fifth leaf stage did not result in the formation of a stem canker... The aim of the work was to investigate the use of foliar fungicides on canola seedlings as an alternative or in addition to the application of a seed dressing for blackleg control in areas of high disease pressure... Results from the field experiments suggest that the addition of a seed dressing and the application of a foliar fungicide gave the best protection...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Blackleg: developing a prioritised management strategy.. Newly deployed novel sources of resistance remain effective for a number of years before virulent blackleg isolates increase in frequency to a level where significant disease results... We can use the fungal life traits to manipulate the fungal population...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Assess blackleg risk to canola yields before spraying crops.. Assess blackleg risk to canola yields before spraying crops Canola growers in the southern cropping region must determine the potential for significant yield losses caused by blackleg infection before investing in and applying post-emergent treatments... Key points contained in the fact sheet include: "It is important for growers to monitor crops each season so they know the extent of blackleg infection and can make more informed management decisions," Dr Marcroft said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Leg-up for canola growers in minimising the risk of blackleg Growers are being equipped with an important tool in their quest to minimise the risk of blackleg - the most damaging disease of canola and juncea-canola in Australia... Industry experts and the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) have developed a Risk Assessor to help growers make the right choices prior to or at sowing this coming season in order to reduce the risk of blackleg... Growers are encouraged to use the Risk Assessor to determine if a paddock presents a high risk situation and what practices can be changed to reduce yield loss caused by blackleg...
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Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
Canola plays a crucial role in Australian agriculture as a cash crop and through its rotational benefits to subsequent cereal crops... Blackleg is managed by breeding for resistance and crop management practices that minimize stubble inoculum... The blackleg fungus is adept at overcoming cultivar resistance leaving many crops vulnerable to significant yield loss...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
In 2013 pod infection was observed in all monitored regions of Victoria... Pod infection will result in seed infection.&nbsp; Infected seeds may die and shrivel and/or cause pod shatter, reducing yield... Even if flower petals are infected, dry conditions or cool wet conditions during petal fall will prevent stem infection development.<strong> <br></strong></li> </ol><h3>Research findings in 2013</h3> <p>In 2013 sclerotinia was observed in all canola producing states it was more severe in North Eastern Victoria, NSW and WA...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
" Date: 09.12.2013 'Perfect storm' sparks sclerotinia outbreak in canola crops.. " , crops have flowered very early this year due to the mild winter temperatures and this has contributed to the levels of disease we observed," said Mr Lindbeck, who is based at the Wagga Wagga Agricultural Institute where he leads Grains Research and Development Corporation-funded research on the management of pulse and oilseed diseases in southern NSW... Mr Lindbeck said that in addition to sclerotinia being an airborne disease, the sclerotinia stem rot pathogen produced hard, black, survival bodies on infected plant tissue called sclerotia which enabled the fungus to survive for up to 10 years in the field...
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Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
The fungal disease 'blackleg' is the most severe disease of canola in Australia, causing yield loss and in some circumstances total crop failure... Blackleg is primarily controlled by breeding disease resistance into canola cultivars prior to release to industry... The project will assess the level of blackleg resistance in all canola cultivars enabling growers to select a cultivar that is suitable for their farming system and climatic region...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
If you sow the same cultivar every year you are likely to break the cultivar's blackleg resistance... If you have a blackleg problem and are growing a susceptible cultivar your first action should be to change to a cultivar with higher levels of resistance... The best policy is to monitor the level of blackleg in your cultivar on your farm, if you observe the level of disease increasing then switch to a different group...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Canola growers can reduce potential yield losses and the probability of blackleg disease resistance breakdown occurring by changing cultivars every three years... That's according to blackleg authority Steve Marcroft who says sowing the same cultivar every year is likely to break the cultivar's resistance to blackleg - the most severe disease of canola in Australia... Speaking at recent Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) grains research Updates throughout the southern cropping region, Dr Marcroft has told growers and advisers that every year a cultivar is sown from the same resistance group, the number of virulent isolates that can attack that particular cultivar increases...
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