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wind speed

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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
GRDC is supporting research to better understand inversion conditions and to provide resources to anticipate and recognize inversion conditions... Temperature inversions suppress vertical motion of the atmosphere and thereby cause concentration rather than dispersion of pesticide droplets, vapour or particulate matter that remain airborne after application... The risk of spraying when inversions exist There is real potential for small droplets, vapour and particulate matter to drift for long distances at high enough concentrations to contaminate and damage sensitive crops and the environment...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Maximising spray efficiency: The tactics to optimise results.. Spray operators need to be able to identify weather conditions associated with inversions... Technology has thrown up a series of challenges that require an improvement in the observation skills of advisers...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
As farmers today I believe we are making some decisions that may lead to increased drift risk... The APVMA direction is placing more pressure on the person applying the pesticide by requiring the applicator to conduct a risk assessment on sprayer set up, the weather conditions and the surrounding downwind environment and to ultimately decide to spray or not... If we are to maintain market access in these markets, we must be looking at these changes and trends with a view to develop a self regulated practical approach to reduce the need for further regulations...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Time and execute your fungicide sprays right and you'll get maximum impact from each treatment, according to spray application experts Bill Gordon and Dr Rohan Rainbow... Have an understanding of how the fungicide you're going to apply works on the plant - most fungicides have limited translocation potential or move upwards and outwards only, meaning sprayers need to target the spray to hit the plant exactly where it's needed... Run the controller with total flow (litres per minute for the whole boom) on the display when spraying and know what the pressure and flow rate should be when delivering the correct number of litres per hectare so that checks can be made as you go, e.g. if pressure increases and flow remains the same, check for blockages...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Studies in Europe have shown that air induction nozzles giving a relatively small droplet size distribution pose less risk to efficacy with many plant protection products... Wind will deflect detrained spray droplets out of the treated area and increasing wind speed will increase the risk of drift... Pure solutions with a surfactant extend the break up distance from the nozzle, produce a finer spray and can increase the risk of drift by more than a factor of two...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Spray operators can obtain advice on minimising the risk of spray drift by consulting the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Fact Sheet Practical tips to reduce spray drift... The resource advises that the risk of spray drift increases substantially when spray equipment travels fast during higher speed winds... To reduce the amount of spray drift spray operators are advised to avoid travel speeds above 16 to 18 km/h during higher wind speeds unless there is excellent boom height control and equipment is set up to minimise airborne droplets by providing spray quality which is coarse or larger...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Spray operators can obtain advice on minimising the risk of spray drift by consulting the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Fact Sheet Practical tips to reduce spray drift... The resource advises that the risk of spray drift increases substantially when spray equipment travels fast during higher speed winds... To reduce the amount of spray drift spray operators are advised to avoid travel speeds above 16 to 18 km/h during higher wind speeds unless there is excellent boom height control and equipment is set up to minimise airborne droplets by providing spray quality which is coarse or larger...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Spray operators can obtain advice on minimising the risk of spray drift by consulting the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Fact Sheet Practical tips to reduce spray drift... The resource advises that the risk of spray drift increases substantially when spray equipment travels fast during higher speed winds... To reduce the amount of spray drift spray operators are advised to avoid travel speeds above 16 to 18 km/h during higher wind speeds unless there is excellent boom height control and equipment is set up to minimise airborne droplets by providing spray quality which is coarse or larger...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Manage speed to eliminate spray drift.. A Canadian study showed that, during higher wind speeds of about 20 kilometres per hour, machinery travelling at about 30km/h almost doubled the amount of chemical contributing to spray drift risk, compared with machinery travel speeds of 8km/h... Spray operators are advised to avoid travel speeds above 16 to 18km/h during higher wind speeds unless there is excellent boom height control and equipment is set up to minimise airborne droplets by providing spray quality which is coarse or larger...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Manage speed to eliminate spray drift.. A Canadian study showed that, during higher wind speeds of about 20 kilometres per hour, machinery travelling at about 30km/h almost doubled the amount of chemical contributing to spray drift risk, compared with machinery travel speeds of 8km/h... Spray operators are advised to avoid travel speeds above 16 to 18km/h during higher wind speeds unless there is excellent boom height control and equipment is set up to minimise airborne droplets by providing spray quality which is coarse or larger...
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