You are here

wheat stem rust

Categorised under:

Catalogue: GRDC Publications
Overall, barley diseases have the potential to cause very significant costs for farmers... Incidence is 30 per_cent frequency in 30 per_cent of the area, so that the average incidence of the disease affecting the crop is 9 per_cent... Overall, breeding contributes more than 25 per cent of the control for 14 diseases, cultural methods for 32 diseases, and pesticides for six barley diseases...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Media
Growers are urged to control the 'green bridge' now and choose disease resistant crop varieties, after wheat stem rust, barley leaf rust and powdery mildew were found in Western Australia's southern cropping regions... Department of Agriculture and Food (DAFWA) researcher Kith Jayasena, whose research is supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC), said the detection of significant amounts of wheat stem rust this year was of particular concern as the disease could cause yield losses of up to 90 per cent in susceptible wheat varieties... " the strategy, when applied in trials in the high yielding environment of Gibson in the Esperance region, provided yields 56 per_cent greater than the unsprayed crop, and economic returns of $399 per hectare - compared with $83/ha from a single fungicide application at the first sign of the disease, and $111/ha for a single spray three weeks after the disease becomes evident," he said...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Media
Western Australian growers with wheat crops susceptible to stem rust should be vigilant in checking crops and spray them early if they find the damaging disease... Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) supported fungicide trials conducted by the Department of Agriculture and Food (DAFWA) have highlighted the importance of responding early to wheat stem rust in susceptible varieties to minimise losses in yield and grain quality... " the strategy, when applied in trials in the high yielding environment of Gibson in the Esperance region, provided yields 56 per_cent greater than the unsprayed crop, and economic returns of $399 per hectare - compared with $83/ha from a single fungicide application at the first sign of the disease, and $111/ha for a single spray three weeks after the disease became evident," Dr Jayasena said...
Related categories:
Catalogue: NVT Online Papers
Regional outbreaks are more common, causing losses over limited areas... Stem rust typically causes losses of 10-50 per cent, but this can increase to up to 90 per cent when it occurs in early spring and is not controlled... Stem rust requires living plants on which to grow and reproduce, so to infect crops during the season it must survive over summer by infecting volunteer cereals or grass hosts, known as the 'green bridge'...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
Although fungicides can control rust, genetic resistance remains the most environmentally acceptable and economical means of rust control in Australia... Northern region grain growers are being reminded to consider adult plant resistance (APR) to fungal diseases such as stem, stripe and leaf rust, when retaining seed this harvest for next year's crop... As news of the first cereal rust outbreaks in southern Australia reach the University of Sydney's Plant Breeding Institute (PBI), northern region growers are reminded to be vigilant in crop monitoring this season...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Cereal rust diseases - recent developments impacting 2011 decisions.. Disease also thrives under these conditions, and stripe rust reached epidemic levels in southern NSW and Victoria... Stem rust also became a cause for concern in late spring through the Mallee of Victoria and South Australia, although crop losses were expected to be light...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Updates
The paper will review the nature and origins of these new pathotypes, and indicate the expected changes in variety response for the 2008 season... These three isolates look different on these wheats, and so we give each the name of 'pathotype', ie it is a 'type' of the pathogen... The first major pathotype change in the WA pathotype occurred in October 2006 when isolates collected from Coleambally (NSW) and Horsham (Victoria) showed the ability to cause disease on plants with the Yr17 resistance gene...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Matthew Williams from the University of Sydney's Plant Breeding Institute with wheat grown under LED lighting... LED technology is finding increasing applications in plant growth; fine-tuning the light spectrum for cereal growth has taken significant trial and error, and development in collaboration with an LED supply company (Grow Candy)... Many had to be crossed with locally adapted germplasm before they could be used in commercial breeding...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Updates
The paper will review the nature and origins of these new pathotypes, and indicate the expected changes in variety response for the 2008 season... These three isolates look different on these wheats, and so we give each the name of 'pathotype', ie it is a 'type' of the pathogen... The second pathotype change was detected among isolates collected early in the 2007 season, and these showed the ability to cause disease on certain triticale varieties, notably Jackie and Breakwell...
Related categories: