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wheat genome

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Catalogue: Ground Cover
An Australian wheat-gene discovery now makes it possible to match wheat genetics with local boron levels.. The team that searched through the wheat genome to identify the boron-tolerance gene examine wheat plants in a glasshouse at the Plant Accelerator, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide... A breeders' 'toolkit' containing diagnostic markers that can distinguish functionally important alleles of the boron-tolerance gene with 100 per cent accuracy is now under development in collaboration with the GRDC-funded Australian Wheat and Barley Molecular Marker Program (UA00143), led by Professor Diane Mather from the University of Adelaide...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
An Australian wheat-gene discovery now makes it possible to match wheat genetics with local boron levels.. The team that searched through the wheat genome to identify the boron-tolerance gene examine wheat plants in a glasshouse at the Plant Accelerator, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide... A breeders' 'toolkit' containing diagnostic markers that can distinguish functionally important alleles of the boron-tolerance gene with 100 per cent accuracy is now under development in collaboration with the GRDC-funded Australian Wheat and Barley Molecular Marker Program (UA00143), led by Professor Diane Mather from the University of Adelaide...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The five-day conference in Sydney last year was attended by more than 600 delegates from every wheat-producing region in the world - both developed and developing - representing regional, national and international organisations... Conference chair Professor Peter Sharp, from the University of Sydney's Plant Breeding Institute, described in his opening address how wheat continued to underpin food security in a world where climate, pests and pathogens were changing... He noted that growers were seeking robust, higher-yielding varieties adapted to climatic, biotic and abiotic stresses; millers and manufacturers of food and beverage products required consistently high-quality raw materials to ensure the integrity of their products; and consumers of wheat products were increasingly discerning...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The five-day conference in Sydney last year was attended by more than 600 delegates from every wheat-producing region in the world - both developed and developing - representing regional, national and international organisations... Conference chair Professor Peter Sharp, from the University of Sydney's Plant Breeding Institute, described in his opening address how wheat continued to underpin food security in a world where climate, pests and pathogens were changing... He noted that growers were seeking robust, higher-yielding varieties adapted to climatic, biotic and abiotic stresses; millers and manufacturers of food and beverage products required consistently high-quality raw materials to ensure the integrity of their products; and consumers of wheat products were increasingly discerning...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Scientists in Perth have found a novel way to control two costly and damaging fungal diseases of wheat - but in a way that will not involve any new chemicals or added costs to growers... The breakthrough hinges on the discovery that these fungi are only infectious if they can awaken obsolete disease-resistance genes that lurk in wheat's vast genome... Researchers have found no yield penalty associated with disease insensitivity (arising from the elimination of Tsn1 from cultivars) as there can be with varieties bred with disease resistance, which is why some growers still risk growing susceptible varieties...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Scientists in Perth have found a novel way to control two costly and damaging fungal diseases of wheat - but in a way that will not involve any new chemicals or added costs to growers... The fungi reactivate and recruit these obsolete genes, using them, in effect, as 'zombies', to damage the plant so the fungi can invade and infect the leaves, subsequently reducing photosynthesis and grain yield... Researchers have found no yield penalty associated with disease insensitivity (arising from the elimination of Tsn1 from cultivars) as there can be with varieties bred with disease resistance, which is why some growers still risk growing susceptible varieties...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The CSIRO researchers believed that the protein behaved differently in the GM peas than it did in beans where it naturally occurs, and that this was the reason it triggered an immune response in mice... Research results from the Medical University of Vienna recently showed only minor differences in the immune response of mice fed several varieties of beans, non-GM peas and the GM peas... The researchers concluded that the immune response in mice was the same irrespective of whether the inhibitor came from beans, where it naturally occurs, or from peas genetically modified to express the inhibitor...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Breakthrough finds wheat's vital sleeper gene.. Two bread wheat genes that provide resistance to pre-harvest sprouting - one of the main impediments to consistent grain quality - have been identified by CSIRO's Agriculture Flagship in a GRDC project... The resistance was thought to be due to the existence of genes collectively called 'dormancy genes' because of their ability to suppress germination (keep seed asleep, so to speak) under conditions that would otherwise lead to pre-harvest sprouting...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Breakthrough finds wheat's vital sleeper gene.. Two bread wheat genes that provide resistance to pre-harvest sprouting - one of the main impediments to consistent grain quality - have been identified by CSIRO's Agriculture Flagship in a GRDC project... The resistance was thought to be due to the existence of genes collectively called 'dormancy genes' because of their ability to suppress germination (keep seed asleep, so to speak) under conditions that would otherwise lead to pre-harvest sprouting...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Diagnostic advances help shut down costly wheat defect.. Many scientists were sceptical when Dr Daryl Mares reported a wheat quality defect that could cause low falling number in the absence of pre-harvest rainfall... Dr Mares and his research group - Dr Kolumbina Mrva, Margaret Pallotta, Dr Klaus Oldach and Dr Judy Cheong - continue their role as lead protagonists in the fight to detect LMA before new wheat varieties reach Australian paddocks and cause the downgrade of otherwise normal-looking grain...
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