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volatilisation loss

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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Top-dressing nitrogen onto crops, fallows and pastures may not be as risky as is generally thought if rain does not fall soon after application... Nitrogen volatilisation losses were assessed in 15 paddocks covering four scenarios: top-dressing wheat; autumn fallow broadcasting ahead of winter cropping; spring fallow broadcasting ahead of summer cropping; and autumn and spring fertiliser application to a grass-based pasture... How much is lost depends on a range of factors including rainfall amount, soil moisture, temperature, pH, naturally occurring lime in the soil, ground cover, wind, soil-clay percentage and fertiliser type...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Volatilisation is the loss of nitrogen to the atmosphere as ammonia gas (NH3) from soils or from fertiliser applied to soil surfaces... We tested all samples with a pHw>7 for their capacity to buffer changes in pH back to 7 (pHBC) as this is where the risk of nitrogen volatilisation ceases (Figure 1)... Urea coated with an organic complex showed no difference from ordinary urea in N volatilisation loss measured in these incubations...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Surface application of ammonium sulphate fertiliser on alkaline cropping soils of northwest NSW poses a high risk of volatilisation loss, particularly if there is calcium carbonate (lime) at the surface... We are currently testing a range of surface soil samples from across northwest NSW and will present some results of these in the talk... Following this we will assess volatilisation loss potential at a selection of these soils to gauge the potential for losses in typical cropping situations...
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Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
Nitrogen losses through volatilisation in this region are potentially high due to the alkaline soil pH, presence of lime in some soils, windy conditions and high temperatures in summer... Our preliminary lab work has demonstrated the importance of naturally occurring lime in soils for setting the potential for nitrogen losses... . If we demonstrate that current applications of surface-applied nitrogen fertiliser are leading to substantial gaseous losses to the atmosphere, farmers will review their practice and opt for less wasteful methods of fertiliser application...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Graeme Schwenke, NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI) soil scientist, says field trials with urea showed that ammonia loss due to volatilisation averaged 11% (5-19%) when applied to fallow paddocks, and 5% (3-8%) when applied to wheat crops... "At the time the crystalline form was comparable in price per unit N to urea and people were spreading it on fallow paddocks ahead of a crop but weren't sure how much would be lost through volatilisation... "Our research showed that volatilisation losses from ammonium sulphate were often only half that from urea, unless the soil contained calcium carbonate (lime) where the opposite was the case...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Graeme Schwenke, NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI) soil scientist, says field trials with urea showed that ammonia loss due to volatilisation averaged 11% (5-19%) when applied to fallow paddocks, and 5% (3-8%) when applied to wheat crops... "At the time the crystalline form was comparable in price per unit N to urea and people were spreading it on fallow paddocks ahead of a crop but weren't sure how much would be lost through volatilisation... "Our research showed that volatilisation losses from ammonium sulphate were often only half that from urea, unless the soil contained calcium carbonate (lime) where the opposite was the case...
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