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branch infection

Catalogue: Ground Cover
Small lesions at the leaf axil (where the stem of a leaf meets the branch) or long lesions the entire height of the plant... "In the past plants only had leaves during the main infection period in the winter, but now plants may have already begun elongation during the winter, so that the plants have stems and branches to be directly infected," Dr Marcroft says... GRDC-funded research undertaken in 2015 by Marcroft Grains Pathology in glasshouses showed that when plants were infected after elongation the upper-stem infections occurred, whereas when they were inoculated during the vegetative stage they developed 'traditional' crown canker but escaped the stem/branch infection...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Monitoring canola crops for blackleg and sclerotinia is essential for making informed decisions about managing these diseases.. The Blackleg Management Guide fact sheet available on the GRDC website describes how to monitor crops and lists all the management practices available.. Dr Lindbeck says foliar fungicides need to be considered in districts at high risk of disease development (areas where disease frequently occurs and where canola has a long flowering period and there is reliable spring rainfall)...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Monitoring canola crops for blackleg and sclerotinia is essential for making informed decisions about managing these diseases.. The Blackleg Management Guide fact sheet available on the GRDC website describes how to monitor crops and lists all the management practices available.. Dr Lindbeck says foliar fungicides need to be considered in districts at high risk of disease development (areas where disease frequently occurs and where canola has a long flowering period and there is reliable spring rainfall)...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Dr Kurt Lindbeck says early intervention is critical in minimising the production impact of sclerotinia stem rot... "Outbreaks of sclerotinia stem rot tend to be sporadic, with levels of disease varying between seasons and regions in southern NSW and northern Victoria, so our advice is for growers to get out into their crops to monitor the situation... "The disease can cause yield reductions of 30 to 40 per cent in heavily infested crops in high-rainfall years, and last year the first warning signs appeared in early August, with apothecia observed in canola crops in southern NSW, and continued wet weather through the month providing periods of extended leaf wetness and opportunities for disease epidemics to develop."..
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