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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Queensland University of Technology's Professor Peter Grace discusses strategies to help avoid nitrogen losses at a recent GRDC Grains Research Update... The loss is caused by chemical reactions on the surface of the soil, and only occurs in alkaline soils when ammonium-based fertiliser is broadcast and there is no rain to wash it into the soil... Rain is required to wash the fertiliser deeper into the soil profile, but not too much that it could cause denitrification or leaching...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
The rainfall pattern encouraged rapid vegetative growth of chickpea crops and was ideal for the build-up and spread of the major chickpea pathogens... Ascochyta blight (AB, caused by Ascochyta rabiei ), Botrytis grey mould (BGM, caused by Botrytis cinerea ), Phytophthora root rot (PRR, caused by Phytophthora medicaginis ) and Sclerotinia rot (caused by both Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Sclerotinia minor ) were widespread and severe in many crops... Timely and thorough applications are critical...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Recommendations are for field pea to be grown on soils with a pH of at least 5, and chickpea to be seeded on soils with a surface pH of a minimum of 5 if the subsoil rises to above 5.5 within 10 to 15cm of the surface... " if the subsurface has not been tested, growers adhering to these recommendations may grow break crops with disappointing yields," Mr Parker said... "If growers follow the recommendations and plant field pea or chickpea crops into soils with a pH minimum of 5 on the soil surface, then 42 per_cent of these paddocks will be unsuitable for chickpea, field pea, legume pasture and, to a lesser extent, barley and canola, due to a declining pH in the subsurface."..
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Consultant's Corner: Break crop research digs beneath the surface - The research view.. Information generated from the Putting the Focus on Profitable Break Crops and Pasture Sequences in WA project has highlighted the importance of growers measuring subsurface pH levels, to prevent break crops being seeded onto unsuitable soils... "If growers follow the recommendations and plant field pea or chickpea crops into soils with a pH minimum of 5 on the soil surface, then 42 per_cent of these paddocks will be unsuitable for chickpea, field pea, legume pasture and, to a lesser extent, barley and canola, due to a declining pH in the subsurface."..
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Yields climb as clay lessons learned.. Using a tracked tractor for added traction, John and Stewart hope to treat at least 50ha a year, but they are aware they may need to hire a contractor to incorporate the clay with a spader... "Adding clay to the topsoil by spreading or delving is really helping to improve the structure of our soils," John says...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (North)
Until such varieties are released, northern growers and advisers need to select varieties firstly on the basis of crown rot risk and then manage for stripe rust ... There is a risk of WSMV being spread through infected seed into new areas... We have not been able to determine an economic threshold for RGB in sorghum from these trials...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (South)
Until such varieties are released, northern growers and advisers need to select varieties firstly on the basis of crown rot risk and then manage for stripe rust ... There is a risk of WSMV being spread through infected seed into new areas... We have not been able to determine an economic threshold for RGB in sorghum from these trials...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Wheat crops on the deep ripped plots have already grown roots and accessed water to a depth of 40cm below the soil surface - a much deeper level compared with the unripped plots... "In coming weeks, roots in the ripped plots may access soil water below 40cm and these crops could produce yields up to 0.5 tonnes per hectare greater than the crops on the untreated plots," CSIRO researcher Phil Ward said... "During winter, there was virtually no water uptake at 20 to 40cm in the untreated soils, but there was significant water uptake and root growth at this depth in the ripped plots," Dr Ward said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Crops on deep ripped soils show promise in dry season.. Wheat crops on the deep ripped plots have already grown roots and accessed water to a depth of 40cm below the soil surface - a much deeper level compared with the unripped plots... "In coming weeks, roots in the ripped plots may access soil water below 40cm and these crops could produce yields up to 0.5 tonnes per hectare greater than the crops on the untreated plots," CSIRO researcher Phil Ward said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
Grain growers, advisers and researchers are invited to attend a free national symposium in May to learn about the latest soil biology research... Ground Cover Radio 116: Start digging for inoculant success check up.. Growers are being encouraged to grab their shovels and look below the soil surface to check if legume inoculants are working...
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