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soil research

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Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
" Eyre Peninsula Farming Systems 3 Responsive Farming Systems.. This project builds on the communication networks, grower groups, research team and reputation developed through two prior GRDC funded Eyre Peninsula (EP) Farming Systems projects that were highly successful in engaging growers, researchers and agribusiness on EP and in promoting relevant outcomes for the community and the grains industry... Eyre Peninsula Farming Systems Summary 2008 (Summary of research results and relevant agricultural information, available free to all farmers on EP and is also sent to other regions and interstate, 1200 copies) Eyre Peninsula Farming Systems Summary 2009 Eyre Peninsula Farming Systems Summary 2010 Eyre Peninsula Farming Systems Summary 2011 Eyre Peninsula Farming Systems Summary 2012 One poster and two papers presented at the 14th Australian Agronomy Conference Global Issues Paddock Action in Adelaide in September 2008...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Millet can have a positive effect on following wheat yields, provided the millet crops are sown early in spring and terminated once 50 % cover is achieved... The results showed that if millet was sown early and removed early (40 days after sowing) there was a neutral or positive impact on wheat yield compared to a traditional fallow... The research shows that it is, differences in wheat yield when comparing the MF millet and CF traditional no-till fallows is significant and could be used to offset the costs of millet establishment...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
A major collaborative research effort aims to develop and deliver solutions for a range of soil constraints which limit productive grain cropping in Western Australia... Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) western regional panel chairman Peter Roberts said 'Soils Constraints - West' was focusing on non-wetting soils, subsoil constraints, soil compaction and soil acidity... "Soil Constraints - West represents more than $33 million of new research aimed at addressing these significant issues over the next five years," he said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
" Date: 24.09.2010 IMPROVING PROFITABILITY OF IRRIGATED SORGHUM THROUGH PARTIAL IRRIGATION OF LARGER AREAS.. Two main management strategies were used by growers in the 2007/08 season: (1) full irrigation, involving two irrigations, one prior to anthesis, and another at or soon after anthesis, and (2) partial irrigation, usually consisting of a single irrigation of greater than 1 ML/ha, timed to coincide with flowering... The broad objective of this research was to assess different irrigation strategies for irrigated sorghum on the heavy clay soils of the eastern Darling Downs...
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Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
Strong interactive effects between biochar type and soil type were demonstrated, highlighting the importance of identifying key factors that are likely to limit plant growth before targeting a suitable biochar... Biochar produced from high nutrient feedstock had some capacity to release nutrients but would be unlikely to be able to supply plant nutrient demands without fertiliser amendment... There is little information available about the loss of biochar from systems as a result of erosion and limited capacity in current modelling frameworks (carbon turnover or plant growth) to incorporate the effects of biochar application...
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Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
ROOTMAP can be used to improve the strength of an experimental design by simulating the effect of different seasons on an experiment; identifying treatments most likely to provide the range of results needed; identifying the number of replications required to produce stable results; investigating the relationship between root growth in a glasshouse study and in the field; and extending the design to test other treatments that might be relevant to the hypothesis... ROOTMAP can also be used to extend research findings beyond pot boundaries and beyond the 2D measurement method used... To date, the use of ROOTMAP has been largely restricted to the creators and developers of the model and close collaborators because of the level of programming and modelling skills required to run it...
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
It is important to remember that there are many ways in which PA can be adopted and used to make or save money, improve timeliness or environmental management and to carry out onfarm trials... If a grower purchases a GPS unit using one system and then changes to one using the other system, locations will not be translate accurately... Growers are not confident in using the currently available indices in making cropping decisions...
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
Soil organic matter contributes to a range of biological, chemical and physical properties of soil and is essential for soil health... Soils rarely reach their theoretical potential for organic matter storage (see Figure 1.7)... In soils with low clay content the amount of humus and resistant soil organic matter is increasingly important to nutrient exchange because its large surface area gathers (adsorbs) cations from the soil solution, holding nutrients that would otherwise leach...
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
Soil organic carbon makes up about 58 per cent of the mass of organic matter and is usually reported in a soil analysis report as the concentration (i.e. per cent) of organic carbon in soil (see Chapter 1 for more detail)... If a soil has a significant amount of gravel or stone material, this fraction is removed before analysis with the final soil carbon or nutrient assessment being only representative of the mineral component of the remaining soil... Understanding how organic matter cycles through the soil and what drives its accumulation and loss is critical to maintaining it at optimal levels within agricultural systems...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
But scientists such as the Department of Agriculture and Food's (DAFWA) Chris Gazey say that despite these big steps in the right direction, 2.5 million tonnes annually is needed over the next ten years to treat existing and ongoing soil acidity, which costs WA agriculture more than $500 million per year in lost productivity... Mr Gazey, who recently completed a Caring for our Country soil acidity research project, says WA soils are continuing to acidify, with mapping of the State's agricultural soils highlighting the severity and extent of soil acidity, including subsurface acidity... Mr Gazey says other evidence supporting the need for sustained efforts to address soil acidity includes re-evaluation of a 1994 trial site in a Mingenew paddock showing that lime rates previously considered adequate do not ameliorate soil pH at depth...
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