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soil erosion

Catalogue: GRDC Media
Central Queensland wheat growers have seen low protein levels in this season's crop with the likely causes stemming from the long wet season of 2010-11... These include: low starting soil nitrogen as a consequence of low organic carbon (less mineralised nitrogen) and denitrification; applied bag nitrogen still being close to the surface and not located in moisture where the wheat plant roots could easily access it; crops growing poorly and unable to exploit all the available soil nitrogen; leaching; and soil erosion losses... Log in or register to leave a comment...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Protein lost in long wet season - By Rachel Bowman.. Maurie Conway, from the Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, says the following influences are likely to be contributing to the problem: low starting soil nitrogen due to low organic carbon (less mineralised nitrogen) and denitrification; wheat roots were unable to easily access applied nitrogen because it tended to remain close to the soil surface; soil erosion; and leaching... Mr Conway says nitrogen was mostly depleted by crops, soil erosion and denitrification, whereas losses resulting from leaching were generally low...
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
Soil organic matter contributes to a range of biological, chemical and physical properties of soil and is essential for soil health... Soils rarely reach their theoretical potential for organic matter storage (see Figure 1.7)... In soils with low clay content the amount of humus and resistant soil organic matter is increasingly important to nutrient exchange because its large surface area gathers (adsorbs) cations from the soil solution, holding nutrients that would otherwise leach...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Maintaining and increasing the level of organic carbon in the soil will have benefits in terms of maximising water-holding capacity and crop productivity but farmers should not expect large returns from carbon credits... increase soil organic carbon (soc) by retaining crop residues, green manuring or cover cropping and reducing stocking rates on cropping paddocks... If carbon offsets were valued at $20/tonne of carbon, then the payments would be $2-3/ha and likely to be less than the cost of monitoring and administering a carbon credit program...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Maintaining and increasing the level of organic carbon in the soil will have benefits in terms of maximising water-holding capacity and crop productivity but farmers should not expect large returns from carbon credits... increase soil organic carbon (soc) by retaining crop residues, green manuring or cover cropping and reducing stocking rates on cropping paddocks... If carbon offsets were valued at $20/tonne of carbon, then the payments would be $2-3/ha and likely to be less than the cost of monitoring and administering a carbon credit program...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Maintaining and increasing the level of organic carbon in the soil will have benefits in terms of maximising water-holding capacity and crop productivity but farmers should not expect large returns from carbon credits... increase soil organic carbon (soc) by retaining crop residues, green manuring or cover cropping and reducing stocking rates on cropping paddocks... If carbon offsets were valued at $20/tonne of carbon, then the payments would be $2-3/ha and likely to be less than the cost of monitoring and administering a carbon credit program...
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Catalogue: Nuffield Scholar Reports
Foreword The aim of the research was to find a cover crop, preferably a legume that was fast growing, would leave a heavy stubble residue after knock down, increase the fertility of the soil and reduce soil erosion... The paper outlines cover crops seen in Brazil, USA and France, their purpose, and the idea of planting more than one cover species in a fallow... A farm managed under this system provides the armour to protect the soil from wind and water erosion and acts as a buffer to protect soil life from extreme temperatures' (Brown, 2012)...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Photo of blue dye seeping into soil.. Dr Roper says the trials indicate that the yield gains zero-tillage and stubble retention provid in canola, barley and wheat result from improved water infiltration in the soil... "In our experiments, crops were seeded with discs on the previous year's inter-row, which resulted in no disturbance of remnant root systems from the previous year," Dr Roper says, adding that using this approach with knife points is also unlikely to disturb remnant root systems...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The collaborative approach to whole-farm innovation has delivered valuable lessons for R&D delivery... Grain & Graze evolved from a goal to improve the profitability and sustainability of mixed farms by focusing on cropping, pastures, livestock, profitability, whole-farm economics, farming systems and natural resources... Grazing livestock on cropping soils can: result in livestock trampling of beds and increase surface compaction; decrease the amount of organic matter returned to the soil through stubble grazing; increase the risk of soil erosion during drought by over-grazing stubbles; and reduce returns when grain prices favour cropping over livestock...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
In recent years, researchers have taken a closer look at the fundamentals of soil/tool interactions to shed light on the soil force system acting on disc seeder blades and how soil movement is induced by no-till furrow openers... Using UniSA's indoor seed-placement test rig, Dr Solhjou attached tillage tools to a frame that moves over bins of soil at desired depth and speed... When the furrow opener moved through the bin, these tracers were thrown with the soil and later located using a 3-D digitising frame to quantify soil movement, layer by layer...
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