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rhizoctonia inoculum

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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Yield losses in crops affected by bare patches can be over 50% and crops with uneven growth (Figure 1) may lose up to 20%... Figure 1: Above-ground symptoms of crop unevenness (main picture) are seen when Rhizoctonia damages crown roots, even when seminal roots (inset) escape the infection... Inoculum levels increase in cereal crops at all depths...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Yield losses in crops affected by bare patches can be over 50% and crops with uneven growth (Figure 1) may lose up to 20%... Figure 1: Above-ground symptoms of crop unevenness (main picture) are seen when Rhizoctonia damages crown roots, even when seminal roots (inset) escape the infection... Inoculum levels increase in cereal crops at all depths...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Rhizoctonia root rot is an important disease of cereals in both the southern and western regions of the Australian grain belt... Experiments in western and south eastern Australia have shown that grass-free canola provides an effective break following cereal crops... Experiments in Western Australia and southern Australia have shown that in-furrow fungicides produced greater and more consistent yield responses than seed treatments alone...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Researchers are beginning to unravel the behaviour of a complex and damaging crop root disease known as Rhizoctonia, and finding new ways to manage crops to reduce its impact... Grains Research and Development Corporation-funded research, carried out by CSIRO and other research partners, is outlined in a new GRDC fact sheet for the southern and western cropping regions - Management to Minimise Rhizoctonia in Cereals... The fungus can grow and survive in the soil in the absence of a live plant host, the fungus has a wide host range, there are no resistant cereals, and it is strongly influenced by soil and environmental conditions and the seasonal impacts are difficult to forecast," Dr Gupta said...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Crop sequence does affect Rhizoctonia.. Non-cereal break crops, especially canola, can reduce inoculum levels of Rhizoctonia, despite still being susceptible to damage by this root pathogen - By Vadakattu Gupta.. , data from this work and from previous root disease research is being used to build the soil-borne disease component of the Land-Use Sequence Optimiser (LUSO) model (see page 10)...
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Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
Rhizoctonia bare patch disease remains an important but unpredictable disease for cereals in the southern Australian agricultural region... Management of natural disease suppressive ability of soils has been suggested as a potential solution to control Rhizoctonia bare patch disease... The project will address (i) the shorter-term solutions such as rotation, tillage and fungicides to reduce disease incidence and increase plant growth and yield and (ii) will develop new knowledge that will assist in a longer-term control of Rhizoctonia through improving our understanding and management of natural soil suppressive activity & improved prediction of disease occurrence...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Research sheds light on Rhizoctonia control.. Research sheds light on Rhizoctonia control The use of break crops significantly reduces Rhizoctonia inoculum levels, but this beneficial effect lasts only until the end of the following cereal crop... The lower levels are maintained through to the end of the next summer reducing the risk of Rhizoctonia damage to the crop grown in the year following the break crop. "..
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Biological suppression may cut root disease losses - By Sharon Watt.. The research involves a focus on how the environment and management practices influence levels of Rhizoctonia inoculum that initiate the disease and the extent of infection in cereal crops... Dr Vadakattu says measures targeting both the Rhizoctonia inoculum and the infection itself are needed to help control the disease...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Biological suppression may cut root disease losses - By Sharon Watt.. The research involves a focus on how the environment and management practices influence levels of Rhizoctonia inoculum that initiate the disease and the extent of infection in cereal crops... Dr Vadakattu says measures targeting both the Rhizoctonia inoculum and the infection itself are needed to help control the disease...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Media
Research sheds light on Rhizoctonia control.. Research sheds light on Rhizoctonia control The use of break crops significantly reduces Rhizoctonia inoculum levels, but this beneficial effect lasts only until the end of the following cereal crop... The lower levels are maintained through to the end of the next summer reducing the risk of Rhizoctonia damage to the crop grown in the year following the break crop. "..
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