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rhizobium

Catalogue: GRDC Media
Inoculating legumes is a minor cost for a potentially substantial payoff in terms of extra grain or biomass yield and extra nitrogen in the soil... Only about half the area in Western Australia grown to field pea, vetch and lupin crops is inoculated, leaving plenty of room for growers to improve the nitrogen fixing potential of these crops... One of these, Inoculating legumes: a practical guide, has been through two editions in 18 months because of heavy demand...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Legumes, including pasture legumes, are estimated to fix almost three million tonnes of nitrogen a year in Australia... Inoculation of legumes with rhizobia can deliver substantial nitrogen inputs, but inoculants need to be used strategically and with a risk/benefit approach to maximise the nitrogen delivered... Nitrogen fixation generally increases with crop biomass good agronomic management leading to optimal legume growth will favour higher nitrogen inputs...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Legumes, including pasture legumes, are estimated to fix almost three million tonnes of nitrogen a year in Australia... Inoculation of legumes with rhizobia can deliver substantial nitrogen inputs, but inoculants need to be used strategically and with a risk/benefit approach to maximise the nitrogen delivered... Nitrogen fixation generally increases with crop biomass good agronomic management leading to optimal legume growth will favour higher nitrogen inputs...
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
Rhizobia R hizobia are living micro-organisms (also called root-nodule bacteria) n odules on legume roots contain rhizobia, which fix nitrogen from the air Ea ch type of legume is nodulated by a specific type of rhizobia, which are identified as belonging to different "inoculant Groups" R hizobia in inoculants do not survive well in extremes of temperature (over 30 C and at freezing temperatures) or drying conditions that lead to desiccation Di fferent legume-rhizobia associations will tolerate different soil conditions... Generally rhizobia preferences are similar to those of the legume host - medic, pea, faba bean and chickpea rhizobia prefer neutral to alkaline soils (ph CaCl2 6.0 - 7.5) - lupin rhizobia tolerate acid soils (ph CaCl2 less than 6.0) 2 Photo: G. CumminG.. Always apply the seed dressing first and allow it to fully dry before applying the rhizobia as a second process Al ways use inoculants before their expiry date R eseal opened bags of peat inoculant and use them within 2 weeks of first opening the bag..
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
Rhizobia R hizobia are living micro-organisms (also called root-nodule bacteria) n odules on legume roots contain rhizobia, which fix nitrogen from the air Ea ch type of legume is nodulated by a specific type of rhizobia, which are identified as belonging to different "inoculant Groups" R hizobia in inoculants do not survive well in extremes of temperature (over 30 C and at freezing temperatures) or drying conditions that lead to desiccation Di fferent legume-rhizobia associations will tolerate different soil conditions... Generally rhizobia preferences are similar to those of the legume host - medic, pea, faba bean and chickpea rhizobia prefer neutral to alkaline soils (ph CaCl2 6.0 - 7.5) - lupin rhizobia tolerate acid soils (ph CaCl2 less than 6.0) 2 Photo: G. CumminG.. Always apply the seed dressing first and allow it to fully dry before applying the rhizobia as a second process Al ways use inoculants before their expiry date R eseal opened bags of peat inoculant and use them within 2 weeks of first opening the bag..
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
While knowledge of the processes involved in nitrogen fixation advances, transferring that knowledge into practical benefits for growers continues to be a research focus - By Sarah Clarry.. The quality of the inoculant carrier medium is critical to the effectiveness of the inoculant... IMAGE CAPTION: Nitrogen-fixing nodules have become a vital resource for improving the productivity of Australian crop soils, but sustaining this resource continues to require ongoing research...
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Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
" National Rhizobium Program - Managing rhizobia to maximize N fixation by legumes in agriculture UMU00003 Start Date: 01/07/2005.. There is a need to develop stronger linkages with plant breeding programs to enhance coordinated symbiotic breeding and a need to coordinate with inoculant manufacturers to develop a nation-wide field testing program... Since the primary aim of this project was to provide benefits to Australian legume growers, the principal pathway for commercialisation of outputs from the NRP is via the provision of strains to growers via ALIRU and inoculant manufacturers...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Maximising the nitrogen (N) benefits of rhizobial inoculation.. Inoculation of legumes with rhizobia can deliver substantial N inputs to southern farming systems even when the impact on legume yield is small... Inoculation of legumes with rhizobia is a standard practice...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Inoculating legumes back pocket guide.. Inoculating legumes with rhizobia can enhance nitrogen fixation and represents a minor production cost with a potentially substantial payoff in terms increases in legume nodulation, grain and biomass yield, nitrogen fixation and post-crop soil nitrate levels... Inoculating legumes - The Back Pocket Guide was distributed to northern growers in the Grains Research and Development Corporation's (GRDC) Groundcover magazine in the September/October 2013 edition (Issue 106) and can be downloaded at www.grdc.com.au/GRDC-BPG-InoculatingLegumes ...
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Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
" National Rhizobium Program - Managing rhizobia to maximise N fixation by legumes in agriculture UMU00032 Start Date: 01/07/2008.. The NRP was established in 1998 primarily to make sure growers continued to have access to high quality legume inoculants containing strains of appropriate rhizobia to maximise biological N fixation in pulses and other legumes in crop rotations, and to provide the scientific basis for information and guidance about the practice of legume inoculation... Published outcomes of the project include one handbook, 19 refereed journal papers reporting significant research outcomes, five refereed conference papers and 47 international conference abstracts published...
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