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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Farm biosecurity is a set of measures designed to minimise the risk and protect a property from the entry and spread of unwanted pests (weeds, insects, pathogens and other crop-damaging organisms)... Whilst a farm cannot be barricaded from all pest risks, adopting and ensuring compliance to a few routine best practice procedures can greatly reduce on-farm biosecurity risks safeguarding all involved in agronomic consultancies, field research and field day events... Field days may involve the movement of large numbers of people within production areas and the risk of introducing or spreading new pests within a district should be considered by anyone running this type of event...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (West)
Grower groups can facilitate information delivery on grain Biosecurity issues and could also have a role in neighbourhood networks to develop regional Biosecurity plans... A survey of WA grain growers was conducted in the last 2 years to determine the level and extent to which growers undertake Biosecurity best practices on their farms... Management practices that growers indicated as being implemented with a high degree of frequency were such activities as inspecting crops (Fig 4), recording seed sources (Fig 5), keeping records of grain movement (Figs 6 and 7) and general farm hygiene practices like washing down vehicles and cleaning up around silos to lesser degrees...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The latest casualties in the war on weeds at Peter Mifsud's property north of Clermont, in Central Queensland, are the contractors who once helped to harvest the crops on his 3900-hectare property... "About two years ago we decided to stop using contract harvesters; the risk is just not worth it," says Peter, who has strict biosecurity protocols in place as part of efforts to control weeds... Weeds have been the main focus of Peter's biosecurity efforts since the family bought the Clermont property in 1979, with feathertop Rhodes grass his latest concern...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The latest casualties in the war on weeds at Peter Mifsud's property north of Clermont, in Central Queensland, are the contractors who once helped to harvest the crops on his 3900-hectare property... "About two years ago we decided to stop using contract harvesters; the risk is just not worth it," says Peter, who has strict biosecurity protocols in place as part of efforts to control weeds... Weeds have been the main focus of Peter's biosecurity efforts since the family bought the Clermont property in 1979, with feathertop Rhodes grass his latest concern...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
GRDC chair Richard Clark and his wife Barbara farm 1340 hectares south of Goondiwindi in Queensland; crops include wheat, barley, sorghum, chickpeas, faba beans and canola.. Richard believes in agriculture being driven by sound science.. Richard says his vision is for Australian farming to be a leader internationally, and for Australia to be home to the world's best growers and best scientists working in the best facilities to ensure the Australian grains industry has a profitable, competitive future...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Webinar to address summer fallow spray application.. Achieving the balance will be discussed during a short Spray application in summer fallows webinar, supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC)... "Changing weed species, changing climate patterns and the requirement for double knock applications using contact herbicides to control difficult weeds has seen a significant increase in summer fallow herbicide applications in most broadacre no-tillage farming systems in WA," he said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Growers have begun recording mouse activity on their properties as part of Mouse Census Week which aims to provide farmers, the grains industry and researchers with an unprecedented bank of data about mouse activity in agricultural areas... Farmers and advisers are encouraged to play a role in the census from April 13 to 19 by recording mouse activity via MouseAlert, which is a website and recently-released app aimed at improving early warning of possible plagues to enable a rapid response to increases in mouse activity... "During Mouse Census Week, farmers can easily record mouse activity and hot spots by using MouseAlert on their smartphone, tablet or computer," Mr Henry said...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
" Date: 16.02.2012 Biosecurity protects the farm from costly damage control - By Sharon Abrahams, Communication officer, Plant Health Australia Ensuring seed and hay coming onto the property is clean is a vital part of Andrew Robert's biosecurity program... Some years Andrew does contract hay cutting and baling and some spraying, and he is fastidious about ensuring the mower and baler are clean before going to client farms and before returning to the home farm... IMAGE CREDIT: Ensuring seed and hay coming onto the property is clean is a vital part of Andrew Robert's biosecurity program...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Biosecurity woven into the fabric of day-to-day work.. Because crops are targeted for seed and other high-value markets, we recognised the importance of protecting our property from pests and diseases.".. Kym McIntyre, grains biosecurity officer with Biosecurity Queensland (part of the Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation) and Plant Health Australia, says other biosecurity practices adopted by Woods include observing good farm-hygiene practices, ensuring signage at the front gate clearly indicates the requirements on entering the property, and making sure that during field days vehicles are not driven across paddocks and wash baths are provided for all participants...
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Catalogue: Broadacre Field Crops DAFF QLD
Landowners are responsible for keeping their property free of declared weeds... Class 1 declared weeds are not commonly present in Queensland would seriously threaten Queensland's primary industries, natural environment, livestock, human health and people's livelihoods if found in Queensland are subject to eradication landowners are required by law to keep their land free of Class 1 weeds must not be introduced, kept, released or sold without a permit; penalties of up to $88,000 apply... Class 3 declared weeds are established in Queensland threaten Queensland's primary industries, natural environment, livestock, human health and people's livelihoods must be controlled by landowners whose property is adjacent to an environmentally significant area must not be introduced, supplied, released or sold without a permit; penalties of up to $22,000 apply...
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