You are here

previous crop

Categorised under:

Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Dry weight response of crops to increasing P levels with and without mycorrhizal fungi in the soil... Unlike saprobic soil fungi, which colonise and break down organic matter and do not require a host plant in the system to complete their lifecycle, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), the type found in cropping systems, do require the presence of a host to reproduce and are called obligate symbionts... Having adequate populations of mycorrhizal fungi present in soils can be beneficial and in some cases essential for crop growth...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
The aim of the project was to investigate opportunities to improve the profitability and water use efficiency (WUE) of irrigated cropping... The outcomes from the project were to deliver real economic benefits to the Australian grains industry from field trial demonstrations and the publication of the best management practice guide... The aim of the project was to demonstrate high annual production yields being consistently achieved in an irrigated farming system...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
With two seasons of field trial data now analysed, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) agronomist Kerry McKenzie says with some confidence that planting mungbean crops on narrower row-spacings supports higher yields, even if plant populations remain the same... Mr McKenzie says the GRDC-funded pulse agronomy project led by the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), in partnership with Queensland DAF, at four trial sites in Queensland has demonstrated how agronomic decisions at planting influence crop yield and nitrogen fixation... Damien White, vice-president of the Australian Mungbean Association, says mungbean is the fastest maturing of the summer crop options, with very high water use efficiency: "In a dry year this could make mungbeans the crop to offer the lowest risk and highest potential return to growers."..
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
With two seasons of field trial data now analysed, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) agronomist Kerry McKenzie says with some confidence that planting mungbean crops on narrower row-spacings supports higher yields, even if plant populations remain the same... Mr McKenzie says the GRDC-funded pulse agronomy project led by the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), in partnership with Queensland DAF, at four trial sites in Queensland has demonstrated how agronomic decisions at planting influence crop yield and nitrogen fixation... Damien White, vice-president of the Australian Mungbean Association, says mungbean is the fastest maturing of the summer crop options, with very high water use efficiency: "In a dry year this could make mungbeans the crop to offer the lowest risk and highest potential return to growers."..
Related categories:
Catalogue: Broadacre Field Crops DAFF QLD
Peanuts are a subtropical legume crop needing relatively warm growing conditions and 500 to 600 mm of well-distributed rainfall, plus stored soil water, to produce a high-yielding crop... Peanuts can be grown from southern New South Wales to northern Australia... Contrary to popular belief, peanuts do not need red soil...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Broadacre Field Crops DAFF QLD
Peanuts are a subtropical legume crop needing relatively warm growing conditions and 500 to 600 mm of well-distributed rainfall, plus stored soil water, to produce a high-yielding crop... Peanuts can be grown from southern New South Wales to northern Australia... Contrary to popular belief, peanuts do not need red soil...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Broadacre Field Crops DAFF QLD
Peanuts are a subtropical legume crop needing relatively warm growing conditions and 500 to 600 mm of well-distributed rainfall, plus stored soil water, to produce a high-yielding crop... Peanuts can be grown from southern New South Wales to northern Australia... Contrary to popular belief, peanuts do not need red soil...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
Farmers have responded by growing more cereals... The action is risky, where herbicide resistant weeds can quickly become a problem and the populations of soil borne diseases such as take all and crown rot may increase in ideal conditions and devastate a cereal crop... The project will deliver an economic framework to help determine appropriate 'rules of thumb' for growers about what crop to grow given current costs and prices, yield expectations for the season, the previous crops grown, weed populations and the presence of disease...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Online Farm Trials
Improving yield and protein content of crops by developing phase and ley farming systems using alternative pasture legumes.. Not specified.. Available water capacity computed for each of the specified depth increments..
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Figure 1 Output page of NBudget showing the 6 steps to estimate crop yields for all 6 crops and fertiliser N requirements for bread wheat, durum, barley and canola for the coming season.. Potential grain yields for the other crops were calculated by multiplying the potential wheat yields by constants - 1.05 for durum, 1.33 for barley, 0.50 for canola, 0.64 for chickpea and 0.80 for fababean... To answer the question, we used BOM rainfall data in "NBudget' to simulate cropping of wheat in 2009 and chickpea in 2010, grown under no-till and cultivated systems...
Related categories:

Pages