You are here

wild oat control

Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
Differences exist in herbicide tolerance within many broad acre crop species... Significant yield losses of up to 10% are quite common in sensitive cultivars even at recommended rates... The results will enable farmers and plant breeders in central and southern NSW and Victoria to minimise the risk of any yield loss by avoiding the sensitive combination of herbicide and crop/cultivar...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Updates
For much of the last two decades, they have been managed in-crop, predominantly using Group A herbicides... In recent years it has become clear that herbicide resistant wild oats are becoming a key threat to a sustainable northern farming system... 1. No significant rate response was obtained by increasing the rate of Triflur Xcel or Avadex Xtra in the mixture..
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Updates
" Date: 14.07.2008 WILD OAT MANAGEMENT - NEW OPTIONS FOR OLD CHEMISTRY Take home message Results encouraging from both Triflur Xcel and Avadex Xtra but NOT silver bullets (will nearly always require a post-emergent clean up).. In chickpeas, under extreme wild oats pressure, an average net benefit of $310/ha was obtained (range $242-373) May have better fit in zero/minimum tillage systems Industry needs to reduce Group A usage in crops where viable options exist eg in wheat with Group B and K Focus must be on reducing the wild oat seedbank and include winter/ summer crop rotations in the north.. No significant rate response was obtained by increasing the rate of Triflur Xcel or Avadex Xtra in the mixture..
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Updates
The density of wild oats (Avena fatua) is increasing in the Mid North and this can be attributed to a number of different reasons, including: - an increase in cereal cropping intensity - increase in herbicide resistance, mainly to Group A fop and dim herbicides - the reliance on control measures implemented for annual ryegrass such as pre-emergent herbicides, oaten hay, chaff carts and crop topping, which are generally less effective against wild oats - less tillage resulting in reduced efficacy of pre-emergent herbicides such as tri-allate and trifluralin... Herbicide resistance and wild oats - Peter Boutsalis, University of Adelaide Herbicide resistance in wild oats occurs in all cereal growing regions... A small number of Group B resistant wild oats have been reported...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Dr Hanwen Wu from the NSW DPI says at least three years of focused effort is required if wild oats are to be brought under control... An integrated weed management program comprising crop rotation, pre and post-emergent herbicides and non-chemical options such as seed catching at harvest is essential for this problematic weed... The study showed that seed-catching on its own was not effective because wild oats often shed seeds prior to harvest...
Related categories: