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frosted crop

Catalogue: Ground Cover
Workshops investigate early season frost impact.. Mr Faulkner was one of the presenters at the recent frost-management workshops, which provided practical advice on how to look for frost damage and best manage affected crops... Initiated by the GRDC Southern Panel following input and feedback from consultants across the region, the workshops were attended by hundreds of growers and advisers who were provided with information on how to identify frost damage and the likely success of a range of management strategies...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Like all Western Australian growers, Paul and Siobhan Hicks are finding they are constantly having to push out the technical boundaries to cope with declining rainfall that is compounded by non-wetting soils and increasing frost events... "We have a two-week window after a frost to decide if we will mow for hay or wait to harvest," Paul says... Region National, West, North, South < Keep browsing 0 Responses to Farm inventor finds a way to make frost pay..
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Once frost damage has been confirmed, there are a number of options for dealing with a frosted crop, each with advantages and disadvantages... Agripartner Consulting livestock consultant Hamish Dickson says that whether cutting hay to use on farm or putting livestock on the crop, the key is aligning the feed quality to the class of stock... The class of stock is also important; cattle are unable to efficiently utilise any grain that may develop in the head of a ripened crop, so there is no benefit to allowing the plant to mature and spray topping will likely be the best decision sheep can utilise the grain well, so when grazing sheep, allowing the crop to ripen can provide a boost in nutrition," Mr Dickson said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Once frost damage has been confirmed, there are a number of options for dealing with a frosted crop, each with advantages and disadvantages... Agripartner Consulting livestock consultant Hamish Dickson says that whether cutting hay to use on farm or putting livestock on the crop, the key is aligning the feed quality to the class of stock... The class of stock is also important; cattle are unable to efficiently utilise any grain that may develop in the head of a ripened crop, so there is no benefit to allowing the plant to mature and spray topping will likely be the best decision sheep can utilise the grain well, so when grazing sheep, allowing the crop to ripen can provide a boost in nutrition," Mr Dickson said...
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