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argentina

Catalogue: Ground Cover
No-till farming was linked to the future of sustainable, global food production by visiting Argentinean specialist Andres Begnis when he spoke at the 2007 WA No-Till Farmers Association (WANTFA) Conference in Fremantle... Mr Begnis, from the Argentine No-Till Farmers Association (AAPRESID), told WA growers that in Argentina the practice was conserving soil and soil moisture in dry areas and arresting land degradation... Mr Begnis told the conference that Argentinian growers have been practising no-till since the late 1970s, with a dramatic uptake of the system in 1993, when it was adapted to local conditions - silt to clay loam and sandy soils and an average annual rainfall ranging from 500 to 1000 millimetres...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
And I would suggest that at least in the area of driving farming production forward their government would be miles front of our own... GPS technology is widely used throughout Argentina, close to 100% in areas... We had a very lengthy discussion about mining nutrition using our liquid fertiliser philosophy, until I suggested that with their 120 kg/ha of DAP and 100 units of N to grow 20 t/ha, they were probably mining more than we were...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
A study of zero-till innovations in Argentina has identified technology that also has the potential to improve crop establishment and yields for Australian growers... Mr Gould says for every extra 100mm of stored moisture in a rainfall zone of 600 to 650mm, typical zero-till growers visited in Argentina are achieving an extra 1700 kilograms per hectare of maize, 1400kg/ha of sorghum, 800kg/ha of wheat and 650kg/ha of soybeans... Mr Gould says strong and well-coordinated links between government agencies and researchers, machinery manufacturers, extension providers and the commercial sector are central to the success of zero-till in Argentina...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
A study of zero-till innovations in Argentina has identified technology that also has the potential to improve crop establishment and yields for Australian growers... Mr Gould says for every extra 100mm of stored moisture in a rainfall zone of 600 to 650mm, typical zero-till growers visited in Argentina are achieving an extra 1700 kilograms per hectare of maize, 1400kg/ha of sorghum, 800kg/ha of wheat and 650kg/ha of soybeans... Mr Gould says strong and well-coordinated links between government agencies and researchers, machinery manufacturers, extension providers and the commercial sector are central to the success of zero-till in Argentina...
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