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herbicide efficacy

Catalogue: Broadacre Field Crops DAFF QLD
The recent development of Group A and M multiple-resistant annual ryegrass serves as a stark reminder that persistent use of any herbicide mode of action group can cause resistance... The purpose of the experiment was to determine the best Group A treatments for the control of glyphosate-resistant barnyard grass, when treated at the mid to late tillering growth stage... The purpose of the experiment was to confirm which Group A herbicides provide satisfactory control of glyphosate-resistant barnyard grass under field conditions, and to compare results with those obtained from the glasshouse experiment...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
A large and increasing number of growers now have high levels of resistance to all Group A herbicides... In spite of resistance, many populations of ryegrass can still be controlled by one or more Group A herbicides and many users still rely on post-emergent applications of Group A herbicides to manage escapes in wheat and broadleaf crops... Group A herbicides work much better on small weeds, with performance rapidly declining once plants start to tiller...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
A large and increasing number of growers now have high levels of resistance to all Group A herbicides... In spite of resistance, many populations of ryegrass can still be controlled by one or more Group A herbicides and many users still rely on post-emergent applications of Group A herbicides to manage escapes in wheat and broadleaf crops... Group A herbicides work much better on small weeds, with performance rapidly declining once plants start to tiller...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Preliminary results from a trial in the south-east region of South Australia suggests higher water rates (of up to 100 litres per hectare in a trifluralin/Avadex Xtra mix or 150L/ha for other products) can improve the efficacy of pre-emergent herbicides in stubble-retained systems... Early results from the project suggest higher water rates do improve the efficacy of ryegrass control, particularly with Sakura ... We want to look at the differences between herbicide mixes, so we are hoping to conduct the trial again this year as there may have been environmental effects on herbicide efficacy...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Dr Dale Shaner from the US Department of Agriculture explored the implications of the accelerated breakdown of triazine herbicides for Australian growers at the GRDC Grains Research Update for Advisers in Goondiwindi, Queensland... PHOTO: Clarisa Collis Faster breakdown of triazine or Group C herbicides, and its implications for growers around the world, was a central subject at the recent GRDC Grains Research Update in Goondiwindi, Queensland... Keynote speaker Dr Dale Shaner, from the US Department of Agriculture, said it was a global phenomenon and Australian grain growers may also need to rethink their conventional use of triazine herbicides for long-lasting weed control...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Preliminary results from a trial in the south-east region of South Australia suggests higher water rates (of up to 100 litres per hectare in a trifluralin/Avadex Xtra mix or 150L/ha for other products) can improve the efficacy of pre-emergent herbicides in stubble-retained systems... Early results from the project suggest higher water rates do improve the efficacy of ryegrass control, particularly with Sakura ... We want to look at the differences between herbicide mixes, so we are hoping to conduct the trial again this year as there may have been environmental effects on herbicide efficacy...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
A wet finish to this season's harvest across parts of the northern cropping zone has handed a double edged sword to many growers... Research supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) has shown that growers can significantly increase stored plant available water and the availability of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, by controlling weeds early... By having spray equipment at the ready, using robust rates and adhering to best management spray application recommendations on water rate, environmental conditions, droplet size and boom height, growers can prevent potential crop damage and give the next rotation a real boost...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
A wet finish to this season's harvest across parts of the northern cropping zone has handed a double edged sword to many growers... Research supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) has shown that growers can significantly increase stored plant available water and the availability of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, by controlling weeds early... By having spray equipment at the ready, using robust rates and adhering to best management spray application recommendations on water rate, environmental conditions, droplet size and boom height, growers can prevent potential crop damage and give the next rotation a real boost...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Anecdotal observations in 2009 indicated that use of lime may improve wild radish control... Gazey and Andrew (2010) have demonstrated that the application of lime increased the biomass of a barley crop and decreased the biomass of annual ryegrass, on large plots with markedly different soil pH profiles, in a long-term lime trial at Kellerberrin, WA... The results obtained so far indicate that lime is slowly moving down the soil profile and it has significantly improved soil pH in the top 10 cm soil...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
While winter conditions have now arrived in the north, an unusually warm June prompted a rapid growth response in wheat crops and weeds, forcing growers to implement weed control strategies early and effectively to avoid problems as the season progresses... Planning a coordinated and effective in-crop strategy to control weeds, particularly problem grassy weeds like wild oats, will help growers maximise crop yields while reducing the likelihood of developing a herbicide resistance problem on-farm... In cases where resistance status of weed outbreaks is known or there have been problems in the past with the efficacy of Group A chemicals, growers should consider rotating to a 'den' Group B herbicide or a combination of Groups A and B herbicides, with the aim of using only one Group B chemical within three years...
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