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heat tolerance

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Catalogue: GRDC 2014 Research Summaries
Production of wheat is limited by many abiotic and biotic stresses... The project will consolidate initial achievements and aims to: i) Identify and develop high yielding, widely adapted germplasm with tolerance/resistance to terminal heat and drought stress ii) Transfer reputed heat and drought tolerance genes into Australian elite wheat backgrounds... iii) Identify potentially new sources of resistance to fungal diseases such as yellow rust and septoria, and incorporate those into adapted Australian genetic backgrounds to broaden the genetic base of resistance to diseases iv) Identify molecular markers closely linked to heat and drought tolerance genes and validate them in Australian wheat backgrounds...
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Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
Rationale of the research is growing a diverse range of chickpea genotypes for heat tolerance screening in India (International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Hyderabad) and Australia (Plant Breeding Institute (PBI), Narrabri, New South Wales) over two growing seasons in the field... The broad outcome of this project was to develop an improved understanding of genetic diversity of chickpea genotypes using molecular markers, the effects of high temperature on chickpea growth and yield and to identify traits that can be potentially exploited for future breeding programs on heat tolerance in chickpeas... Improved knowledge of high temperature effects on plant responses under stressed and non-stressed environments is required for effective germplasm screening...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Western Australian research has shown that canola is most vulnerable to heat damage at flowering and early pod fill stages, and that high temperatures can halve the yield potential of some varieties... Unseasonably hot weather has reduced the yield potential of many WA canola crops in recent seasons, and some cropping areas this year experienced record temperatures exceeding 34 C in early September... Dr Chen says the information could be used by growers to help them adjust sowing times and select varieties to minimise the risk of yield losses...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Western Australian research has shown that canola is most vulnerable to heat damage at flowering and early pod fill stages, and that high temperatures can halve the yield potential of some varieties... Unseasonably hot weather has reduced the yield potential of many WA canola crops in recent seasons, and some cropping areas this year experienced record temperatures exceeding 34 C in early September... Dr Chen says the information could be used by growers to help them adjust sowing times and select varieties to minimise the risk of yield losses...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Dr Viola Devasirvatham undertaking a chickpea heat-tolerance field experiment at the Plant Breeding Institute at Narrabri... The discovery of heat-tolerant chickpea genotypes may improve the reliability of yields in the northern grainbelt of Australia and other semi-arid environments around the world... Crop phenology (days to first flowering, days to 50 per cent flowering, days to first pod and days to maturity), growth (plant height, plant width and biomass at harvest) and grain yield (including pod number per plant, filled pod number per plant and seed number per plant) were recorded in both seasons...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Considerable progress is being made to develop genetic 'tools' that plant breeders need to select heat-tolerant genotypes for future crops able to withstand heat stress... Grain samples from the field experiments are also being used to identify varieties that maintain better grain quality under heat stress in work led by Helen Taylor and Denise Pleming (NSW DPI, Wagga Wagga) and Dr Mike Sissons (NSW DPI, Tamworth)... An essential next step will be to quantify the yield benefits associated with the markers under normal rain-fed conditions and under various naturally occurring heat scenarios in different Australian wheat-growing regions...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Considerable progress is being made to develop genetic 'tools' that plant breeders need to select heat-tolerant genotypes for future crops able to withstand heat stress... Grain samples from the field experiments are also being used to identify varieties that maintain better grain quality under heat stress in work led by Helen Taylor and Denise Pleming (NSW DPI, Wagga Wagga) and Dr Mike Sissons (NSW DPI, Tamworth)... An essential next step will be to quantify the yield benefits associated with the markers under normal rain-fed conditions and under various naturally occurring heat scenarios in different Australian wheat-growing regions...
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Catalogue: GRDC 2014 Research Summaries
To address the concerns, we will identify chromosome regions governing variation in heat tolerance and deliver DNA-based genetic markers that breeders can use to select for the favourable chromosome variants... Chromosome regions governing heat tolerance traits will be identified by following segregation in experimental populations derived from bi-parental crosses, as well as by identifying marker-trait associations across a broad collection of elite and exotic germplasm... Lines possessing heat tolerance traits identified in greenhouse/chamber experiments (maintenance of chlorophyll and single grain weight) will also be evaluated in the field to establish the relevance of these assays to heat tolerance breeding...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Researchers from the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), including the University of Queensland and CSIRO, have identified heat-tolerant sorghum lines that commercial breeders can use to develop new hybrids in the next five to 10 years... "The implications of this heat tolerance are that growers should be able to improve yield and reduce risk through the selection of suitable sorghum hybrids," Professor Hammer says... "Planting in early to mid-October increases the risk that high temperatures - experienced throughout late December and early January - could coincide with the emergence and flowering of the seed head," Professor Hammer says...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Researchers from the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), including the University of Queensland and CSIRO, have identified heat-tolerant sorghum lines that commercial breeders can use to develop new hybrids in the next five to 10 years... "The implications of this heat tolerance are that growers should be able to improve yield and reduce risk through the selection of suitable sorghum hybrids," Professor Hammer says... "Planting in early to mid-October increases the risk that high temperatures - experienced throughout late December and early January - could coincide with the emergence and flowering of the seed head," Professor Hammer says...
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