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rust epidemic

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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Samples inform rust research.. A sample of wheat infected with stripe rust.. The main points to remember when providing samples are: any sample is better than no sample; send the best sample you can, which is preferably the equivalent of 10 centimetres of leaf or stem that is infected with rust (see photo above for example); send it as soon as you can; never use plastic packaging; and send as much information with the sample as you can...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Grain growers are being urged to start monitoring this year's emerging crops for rust and prepare a rust-management plan following early detections of severe stem rust in volunteer wheat crops in the southern region... "In developing a rust-management plan, growers should also revisit the susceptibility of the varieties they have selected to grow and tailor their action plan to the level of resistance present.".. "There is plenty of help available if growers are not sure how susceptible their varieties are or which is the best approach to take - check with your local agronomist, plant pathologist, your regional variety guide or visit the Rust Bust website ( www.rustbust.com.au ) or the National Variety Trials website ( www.nvtonline.com.au )...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Grain growers are being urged to start monitoring this year's emerging crops for rust and prepare a rust-management plan following early detections of severe stem rust in volunteer wheat crops in the southern region... "In developing a rust-management plan, growers should also revisit the susceptibility of the varieties they have selected to grow and tailor their action plan to the level of resistance present.".. "There is plenty of help available if growers are not sure how susceptible their varieties are or which is the best approach to take - check with your local agronomist, plant pathologist, your regional variety guide or visit the Rust Bust website ( www.rustbust.com.au ) or the National Variety Trials website ( www.nvtonline.com.au )...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Dr Grant Hollaway in a paddock of self-sown barley heavily infected with stem rust and leaf rust, which provides a 'green bridge' for these rust pathogens to survive between cropping cycles... The region comprises a tapestry of overlapping crops at all growth stages, providing an ideal environment for rust to flourish... Growers should also consider the use of fungicide applied to seed or fertiliser in districts known to have rust surviving on volunteers...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Dr Grant Hollaway in a paddock of self-sown barley heavily infected with stem rust and leaf rust, which provides a 'green bridge' for these rust pathogens to survive between cropping cycles... The region comprises a tapestry of overlapping crops at all growth stages, providing an ideal environment for rust to flourish... Growers should also consider the use of fungicide applied to seed or fertiliser in districts known to have rust surviving on volunteers...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The fungal pathogens that cause rust diseases can only grow on living plant tissue, and will only survive on dead plants for a matter of weeks... The lack of living cereal plants during the noncropping summer period creates a "bottleneck" for rust pathogens, resulting in a huge reduction in the size of rust populations... GRDC Research Code US315 More information: Robert Park, 02 9351 8806, robertp@camden.usyd.edu.au [Photo (left) by Dr Grant Hollaway, Department of Primary Industries Victoria: Self-sown (volunteer) cereals - such as this wheat in the Wimmera in February 2005 - can harbour rust pathogens during the non-cropping summer period, providing a source of inoculum to initiate rust epidemics in the following cropping cycle.]..
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