You are here

heat stress

Categorised under:

Catalogue: GRDC Media
Unseasonal hot weather reduced the yield potential of many Western Australian canola crops this year, but research could help deliver varieties with better heat tolerance in the future... "WA canola crops - particularly in the northern and eastern grainbelt - suffered from heat stress this season, and this is likely to happen again in future seasons," UWA Institute of Agriculture and School of Plant Biology researcher Sheng Chen said... Dr Chen said it was too early to determine which canola lines had superior heat tolerance, but independent research led by Wallace Cowling at the UWA Institute of Agriculture had identified some heat tolerant lines of Brassica rapa , an ancestor of canola grown as an oilseed or vegetable crop in some countries...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
Rationale of the research is growing a diverse range of chickpea genotypes for heat tolerance screening in India (International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Hyderabad) and Australia (Plant Breeding Institute (PBI), Narrabri, New South Wales) over two growing seasons in the field... The broad outcome of this project was to develop an improved understanding of genetic diversity of chickpea genotypes using molecular markers, the effects of high temperature on chickpea growth and yield and to identify traits that can be potentially exploited for future breeding programs on heat tolerance in chickpeas... Improved knowledge of high temperature effects on plant responses under stressed and non-stressed environments is required for effective germplasm screening...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
" MCVP - Assessing and managing heat stress in cereals.. Study seeks new insights into heatwave effects.. Researchers are calculating the risk and assessing the impact of heat stress at flowering to help growers choose the most appropriate varieties for their location < Keep browsing..
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Media
Unseasonal hot weather reduced the yield potential of many Western Australian canola crops this year, but research could help deliver varieties with better heat tolerance in the future... "WA canola crops - particularly in the northern and eastern grainbelt - suffered from heat stress this season, and this is likely to happen again in future seasons," UWA Institute of Agriculture and School of Plant Biology researcher Sheng Chen said... Dr Chen said it was too early to determine which canola lines had superior heat tolerance, but independent research led by Wallace Cowling at the UWA Institute of Agriculture had identified some heat tolerant lines of Brassica rapa , an ancestor of canola grown as an oilseed or vegetable crop in some countries...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Dr Viola Devasirvatham undertaking a chickpea heat-tolerance field experiment at the Plant Breeding Institute at Narrabri... The discovery of heat-tolerant chickpea genotypes may improve the reliability of yields in the northern grainbelt of Australia and other semi-arid environments around the world... Crop phenology (days to first flowering, days to 50 per cent flowering, days to first pod and days to maturity), growth (plant height, plant width and biomass at harvest) and grain yield (including pod number per plant, filled pod number per plant and seed number per plant) were recorded in both seasons...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Considerable progress is being made to develop genetic 'tools' that plant breeders need to select heat-tolerant genotypes for future crops able to withstand heat stress... Grain samples from the field experiments are also being used to identify varieties that maintain better grain quality under heat stress in work led by Helen Taylor and Denise Pleming (NSW DPI, Wagga Wagga) and Dr Mike Sissons (NSW DPI, Tamworth)... An essential next step will be to quantify the yield benefits associated with the markers under normal rain-fed conditions and under various naturally occurring heat scenarios in different Australian wheat-growing regions...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Considerable progress is being made to develop genetic 'tools' that plant breeders need to select heat-tolerant genotypes for future crops able to withstand heat stress... Grain samples from the field experiments are also being used to identify varieties that maintain better grain quality under heat stress in work led by Helen Taylor and Denise Pleming (NSW DPI, Wagga Wagga) and Dr Mike Sissons (NSW DPI, Tamworth)... An essential next step will be to quantify the yield benefits associated with the markers under normal rain-fed conditions and under various naturally occurring heat scenarios in different Australian wheat-growing regions...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC 2014 Research Summaries
In many self-pollinating crops such as wheat, heat stress at the time of pollen development results in pollen sterility and a severe reduction in grain number... Heat and other abiotic stresses appear to affect tapetal development and the timing of tapetal degradation, making it occur prematurely and thereby causing pollen abortion and sterility... Heat-sensitive and tolerant wheat varieties will be subjected to heat stress treatment and the association of faulty tapetal development and premature tapetal degradation with heat-induced sterility Our laboratory has identified genes in wheat that control the timing of this event...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Armed with a purpose-built heat chamber, Dr Talukder and his supervisors, Dr Gurjeet Gill and Dr Glenn McDonald, took trials out of the laboratory and into the paddock to test the influence of short-term temperature extremes on six wheat varieties... "Almost all previous heat-stress research has taken place in controlled environmental conditions, so we wanted to develop an efficient methodology to simulate heat stress in the field to identify heat-tolerant varieties," Dr Talukder says... "We found a single day of heat stress just prior to flowering and at early grain fill significantly reduced the carbohydrate reserves in stems and decreased the weight and number of grains," he says...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Updates
The SAGIT funded project involves using a controlled environment assay that is run at Roseworthy, to identify and quantify the level of heat stress tolerance in current varieties, advanced breeders lines and exotic lines, as well as using 'gene mapping', to genetically dissect and understand the key sources of tolerance identified to date... Figure 1 illustrates the fertility and grain size response for a subset of varieties to heat stress in the controlled environment assay. In general heat stress causes a significant (p<0.05) reduction in both grain number and grain size, the two key yield components and ultimately grain yield... A subset of exotic introductions that have been screened for heat stress tolerance in the controlled environment assay, showing diverse levels of adaption...
Related categories:

Pages