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grain pest

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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
Storing pulses successfully requires a balance between ideal harvest and storage conditions... Harvesting at 14 per cent moisture content captures grain quality and reduces mechanical damage to the seed but requires careful management to avoid deterioration during storage... Pulses stored above 12 per_cent moisture content require aeration cooling to maintain quality...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
A 'proof of absence' of grain pests is increasingly being required for Australian grain exports, but it is a challenge that delivers a marketing advantage... Gathering proof of absence is a complex challenge because the many different types of grain grown across the country are often delivered, stored and transported thousands of kilometres before finally being shipped overseas... Once grain leaves the farm, inspection of grain for quality and the absence of pests and diseases is routinely undertaken by the bulk-handling companies in their storage facilities and prior to export...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
The cold months of winter are the ideal time to clean empty grain silos to eradicate insects harbouring in grain residues, according to grain storage specialist Chris Newman... "Now, while it is cold, is an excellent time to remove grain residues - which provide a source of food for insects - from silos and surrounding areas," he said... Region West, National, North, South < Keep browsing 0 Responses to Time to clean silos and banish grain pests..
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
When placing grain into storage, first run the aeration fans continuously for 2-3 days to create even moisture conditions... For this to be effective, the storage must be gas tight so that the phosphine can be maintained at a level high enough to kill grain pests at all stages of their life cycle (egg, larva, pupa and adult)... It is important that stored grain should be monitored for the incursion of insects, as well as correct grain temperature, moisture content, and changes in grain quality or germination...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Whether storing harvested grain for future marketing or crop planting, key factors to consider are silo hygiene and aeration, insect and pest control, grain quality and economics... The South East Premium Wheat Growers Association (SEPWA) has produced booklets called ' Dealing with a Difficult Harvest ' and ' The WA Guide to High Moisture Harvest Management' and these recommend minimal handling and using cool, aerated conditions when storing sprouted grain... An example of this in WA is the Candeloro family, who store 85 per cent of grain (including wheat, canola and barley) produced annually on their 8000ha Toodyay property in state-of-the-art storage and handling facilities that have a capacity of 38,000 tonnes...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Whether storing harvested grain for future marketing or crop planting, key factors to consider are silo hygiene and aeration, insect and pest control, grain quality and economics... The South East Premium Wheat Growers Association (SEPWA) has produced booklets called ' Dealing with a Difficult Harvest ' and ' The WA Guide to High Moisture Harvest Management' and these recommend minimal handling and using cool, aerated conditions when storing sprouted grain... An example of this in WA is the Candeloro family, who store 85 per cent of grain (including wheat, canola and barley) produced annually on their 8000ha Toodyay property in state-of-the-art storage and handling facilities that have a capacity of 38,000 tonnes...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Protection, aeration and hygiene are the three critical aspects of successfully storing grains on-farm, grain storage expert Peter Botta says... "With harvest approaching, it is a timely reminder for growers looking to optimise grain quality and manage risk to get their storage systems in order," he says... A second benefit of aeration systems is their potential to minimise risks of rain during harvest, particularly given it may not be economic for growers to invest in a grain dryer on the off-chance of a wet harvest...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
"With harvest approaching, it is a timely reminder for growers looking to optimise grain quality and manage risk to get their storage systems in order," he says... A second benefit of aeration systems is their potential to minimise risks of rain during harvest, particularly given it may not be economic for growers to invest in a grain dryer on the off-chance of a wet harvest... Remove food sources so insect numbers do not build up: mow or spray grass weeds; remove rubbish, such as pieces of tin on the ground; bury or burn grain spills; and clean out all machinery...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Stored grain should be monitored monthly for the incursion of insects, preferably by positioning insect traps and sampling at the top and bottom of storages... For this to be effective, the storage must be gas tight so that the phosphine can be maintained at a level high enough to kill grain pests at all stages of their life cycle (egg, larva, pupa and adult)... It is important that stored grain should be monitored for the incursion of insects, as well as correct grain temperature, moisture content, and changes in grain quality or germination...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Grain farmers may have eased off monitoring their stored grain this winter, but Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Queensland grain storage specialist Philip Burrill says monitoring in winter is still important... "If you don't have aeration cooling set up, the core temperature of your grain is still warm, sitting at 25 - 30 degrees which is perfectly suitable for pests... " the insect you have found may not even be a grain pest, but instead some random insect resting on the top of your grain...
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