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bowel cancer

Catalogue: Ground Cover
International studies have shown that people who eat wholegrain and high-fibre foods regularly are less likely to develop bowel cancer, the most common cancer in Australia... Wholegrain foods also appear to offer some protection against stomach cancer, and the high phytoestrogen levels found in wholegrains, and especially in pulses, may play a part in protecting against breast and prostate cancer... Food made with wholegrain, or ground wholegrain in the form of wholemeal flour, contains all parts of the grain - the bran, germ and endosperm - making them higher in fibre than products made from refined grains...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Research has shown that diets high in fibre derived from grain foods, fruits and vegetables can help reduce the risk of bowel cancer... Bowel Cancer Australia encourages Australians to increase their fibre intake and limit consumption of processed red meat... The research, which involved more than 101,800 men and women from around the world, found that people who consumed large amounts of legumes had a significantly lower risk of developing bowel cancer...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Bowel Cancer Australia encourages Australians to increase their fibre intake and limit consumption of processed red meat... With such an impressive nutritional profile, it is not surprising that eating legumes provides a range of health benefits, including reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and weight gain... The research, which involved more than 101,800 men and women from around the world, found that people who consumed large amounts of legumes had a significantly lower risk of developing bowel cancer...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The importance of pulses (legumes) in gut function and bowel health is largely misunderstood in Australia, where the rate of colorectal cancer is the second highest in the world.. Dr David Topping, chief research scientist at CSIRO's Food and Nutrition Flagship in Adelaide, says that in Australia most of the fibre is consumed as (insoluble) cereal fibre, with the increasing disease rate due to a deficiency of fermentable fibres such as resistant starch - a component of pulses... "If we don't eat enough resistant starch, the good bacteria in our large bowel get hungry and feed on other things including protein, releasing potentially damaging products such as phenols [digestion products of aromatic amino acids] instead of beneficial short-chain fatty acids," Dr Topping says...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The importance of pulses (legumes) in gut function and bowel health is largely misunderstood in Australia, where the rate of colorectal cancer is the second highest in the world.. Dr David Topping, chief research scientist at CSIRO's Food and Nutrition Flagship in Adelaide, says that in Australia most of the fibre is consumed as (insoluble) cereal fibre, with the increasing disease rate due to a deficiency of fermentable fibres such as resistant starch - a component of pulses... "If we don't eat enough resistant starch, the good bacteria in our large bowel get hungry and feed on other things including protein, releasing potentially damaging products such as phenols [digestion products of aromatic amino acids] instead of beneficial short-chain fatty acids," Dr Topping says...
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