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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Significant advances in future farm productivity will be enabled by robotics and autonomous systems... Production advances will be by a step-change in productivity through the use of many small autonomous robots that operate within a whole-farm optimisation context... In the short paper, we describe our current work that addresses weed maintenance and crop intelligence...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Significant advances in future farm productivity will be enabled by robotics and autonomous systems... Production advances will be by a step-change in productivity through the use of many small autonomous robots that operate within a whole-farm optimisation context... In the short paper, we describe our current work that addresses weed maintenance and crop intelligence...
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Catalogue: GRDC YouTube channel
" Over The Fence North: Understanding crop variability can be as easy as UAV 29 October 2014.. Something is in the air at Ben Boughton.. Technology to reduce spray drift GCTV: Drift Reducing Technology..
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Ben Boughton recently visited the US and Canada to research how unmanned aerial vehicles might benefit Australian grain growers.. Nuffield Scholar Ben Boughton says unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) capture useful data, but the sensors and processing systems need further research... For growers with little time or capacity to develop the specialised skills required to process and interpret UAV data, Ben says the 'go-to people' are agronomists or specialist UAV service providers...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Researchers in southern Victoria are taking to the skies to see if unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can be used to help growers make timely interventions in canola establishment... Three sites were set up across southern Victoria in 2015 at Rokewood, Inverleigh and Winchelsea... There were six stages involved in the image processing: collection of colour infrared images; colour, texture and shape used to identify plants and create a binary image; self-learning algorithms used to detect larger and average-sized plants; the same algorithms then modified to detect small plants; the two images put together to calculate totals; and calculation of ground cover...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Researchers in southern Victoria are taking to the skies to see if unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can be used to help growers make timely interventions in canola establishment... Three sites were set up across southern Victoria in 2015 at Rokewood, Inverleigh and Winchelsea... There were six stages involved in the image processing: collection of colour infrared images; colour, texture and shape used to identify plants and create a binary image; self-learning algorithms used to detect larger and average-sized plants; the same algorithms then modified to detect small plants; the two images put together to calculate totals; and calculation of ground cover...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Nuffield Scholar Ben Boughton is using his Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to deliver high-resolution images, providing him with valuable crop information throughout the season... "With my UAV, I can use an infrared sensor to collect biomass data and then alter my variable rate fertiliser application, improving my productivity by putting more fertiliser down where I need it and less where I don't," Mr Boughton said... As well as tracking weed populations and identifying nutrient deficiencies, Mr Boughton said he can use the data his UAV collects to update his variable rate maps...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
The goal of the UAV is to provide another Precision Technology tool to growers in the decision making process to identify better management practices that achieve higher yield and profit outcomes for growers... The UAV will be another component of precision technology that most growers are already using such as yield mapping, EM surveys, satellite NDVI imagery, and will be used in conjunction, not necessarily as a replacement... If there is a variation in plant biomass or plant health in a specific area and there is a need to quantify the extent of the issue, then the UAV should be able to help identify the issue and aid in the decision making process for the appropriate action...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Three men with a remote controlled drone (From left) Researchers John Moore, from DAFWA, and Nik Callow and Christian Nansen, from the University of Western Australia, testing out a new six-channel, multi-spectral camera for insect, nutrient deficiency and frost damage detection in plot trials in Perth... UWA's entomology and geography scientists and their students are using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that can fly at fast speeds and hover to detect and assess crop plants that are under stress... Using UAVs and the latest camera technologies could be a cost-efficient way for growers to: detect patches of insects and pests in broadacre paddocks for strategic and targeted insecticide and pesticide applications; find nutrient-deficient areas of paddocks for specific testing and treatment; and quickly identify frosted areas to make marketing decisions...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Lobbying the US Federal Aviation Authority and promoting modern farming practices for production and environmental gains are all part of a farming day for Robert Blair.. Idaho farmer Robert Blair shared his vision for precision technologies and how he is helping to make this happen in the US at the 15th Symposium on Precision Agriculture in Australasia... His mission is to encourage greater uptake by spending time sharing his knowledge of and enthusiasm for of precision agriculture (PA)...
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