You are here

date legume

Catalogue: Ground Cover
Research has shown that diets high in fibre derived from grain foods, fruits and vegetables can help reduce the risk of bowel cancer... Bowel Cancer Australia encourages Australians to increase their fibre intake and limit consumption of processed red meat... The research, which involved more than 101,800 men and women from around the world, found that people who consumed large amounts of legumes had a significantly lower risk of developing bowel cancer...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Bowel Cancer Australia encourages Australians to increase their fibre intake and limit consumption of processed red meat... With such an impressive nutritional profile, it is not surprising that eating legumes provides a range of health benefits, including reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes and weight gain... The research, which involved more than 101,800 men and women from around the world, found that people who consumed large amounts of legumes had a significantly lower risk of developing bowel cancer...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Media
Studies have revealed that growing crop legumes in rotation with cereals can often reduce the need for nitrogen fertiliser inputs by 40 to 80 kilograms per hectare, and improve crop productivity... Basic principles and practical management information relating to nitrogen fixation by crop legumes is contained in a new fact sheet released by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC)... The ability of legumes to form a mutually beneficial association with rhizobia and fix atmospheric nitrogen gas enables them to grow in almost any soil without nitrogen fertiliser...
Related categories:
Catalogue: Ground Cover
Legumes, such as beans, peas, chickpeas and lentils, have lots of potential as health foods because they provide an inexpensive source of plant protein and dietary fibre... While the current Australian Dietary Guidelines do not provide recommendations for weekly consumption of legumes, the Grains and Legumes Nutrition Council (GLNC) urges people to eat legumes at least two to three times a week as part of a balanced diet... Preliminary findings of the study, which were presented at a joint Annual Scientific Meeting of the Nutrition Society of Australia and the Nutrition Society of New Zealand in December 2013, suggest that the adults studied were not eating enough legumes...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Media
Studies have revealed that growing crop legumes in rotation with cereals can often reduce the need for nitrogen fertiliser inputs by 40 to 80 kilograms per hectare, and improve crop productivity... Basic principles and practical management information relating to nitrogen fixation by crop legumes is contained in a new fact sheet released by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC)... The ability of legumes to form a mutually beneficial association with rhizobia and fix atmospheric nitrogen gas enables them to grow in almost any soil without nitrogen fertiliser...
Related categories: