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crown disease

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Catalogue: Ground Cover
A bridge too far - weeds a reservoir for hidden diseases.. Weeds that survive in a bridge, both living and dead, harbour multiple crop diseases including crown rot, rust and powdery mildew, says Sue Thompson from the Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF)... Controlling weeds in green and brown bridges is a community issue and requires neighbours to work together to remove volunteers and weeds, Ms Thompson says...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
In the central to west Midlands region where I work as an agricultural consultant, I didn't see much evidence of disease until about mid-June... But as temperatures have dropped, crops have slowed in growth and many have turned a bit yellow... Growers are encouraged to take part in the campaign and submit samples so researchers can recover current strains of the fungus, monitor the pathogen and stay on top of any changes, so they are best placed to combat it...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
In the central to west Midlands region where I work as an agricultural consultant, I didn't see much evidence of disease until about mid-June... But as temperatures have dropped, crops have slowed in growth and many have turned a bit yellow... Growers are encouraged to take part in the campaign and submit samples so researchers can recover current strains of the fungus, monitor the pathogen and stay on top of any changes, so they are best placed to combat it...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Think long-term on soilborne root diseases.. "When soil moisture and nutrition is adequate, cereal plants may be able to do quite well even in the presence of high inoculum levels," said Department of Agriculture and Food WA (DAFWA) plant pathologist Daniel H berli, who conducts Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) funded research into soilborne diseases... "The danger is that growers might be unaware that high disease inoculum levels are present and the diseases might cause significant damage to cereal crops during a dry spring or in subsequent drier years...
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Catalogue: GRDC Research Summaries
The guide will help you identify the common root and crown diseases that cause damage to cereal crops across Australia... Some of the diseases can be initially identified from paddock symptoms whilst others require a more careful inspection of the roots or lower stems of infected plants... Cereal Root and Crown Diseases: The Back Pocket Guide < Keep browsing 0 Responses to Cereal Root and Crown Diseases: The Back Pocket Guide..
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
Published: May 2012 ISBN: 978-1-921779-19-0 In submitting this report, the researchers have agreed to the GRDC publishing this material in its edited form... Incidence is 40 per_cent frequency in 25 per_cent of the area, so that the average incidence of the disease affecting the crop is 10 per_cent... Eighteen, including all the fungal diseases, of the 21 diseases surveyed were reported as present on lentils in the 8.3 Diseases of lentils Southern Region and in Australia...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Cereal disease expert recognised for communication efforts.. The Seed of Light award was presented to Dr Wallwork, cereal pathology principal scientist with the South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI), at the GRDC grains research Update in Adelaide this week... "During a distinguished career spanning three decades, Dr Wallwork has played an influential role in the management of disease on cropping properties across Australia through the delivery of high-impact publications and communications, his willingness to share his wealth of knowledge and his contribution to the development of cereal cultivars with genetic resistance," Mr Konzag said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
The Seed of Light award was presented to Dr Wallwork, cereal pathology principal scientist with the South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI), at the GRDC grains research Update in Adelaide this week... "During a distinguished career spanning three decades, Dr Wallwork has played an influential role in the management of disease on cropping properties across Australia through the delivery of high-impact publications and communications, his willingness to share his wealth of knowledge and his contribution to the development of cereal cultivars with genetic resistance," Mr Konzag said... "Dr Wallwork first joined SARDI in 1984 after completing a post-doctoral fellowship researching resistance to take-all in wheat and since then has been instrumental in identification of new and emerging threats to the SA grains industry," Mr Konzag said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
If fungicides are required, make sure they are applied in the early stages of the epidemic... Spot form of net blotch (SFNB) was the dominant foliar disease of barley, causing yield and quality losses where susceptible varieties were grown in infected stubble and left untreated... In addition to mixing or rotation of fungicides an integrated approach to disease control that includes crop rotation and avoidance of susceptible cultivars will reduce inoculum loads, and reduce the likelihood of resistance to fungicides developing...
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Catalogue: GRDC Publications
The guide will help you identify the common root and crown diseases that cause damage to cereal crops across.. Some of the diseases can be initially identified from paddock symptoms whilst others require a more careful inspection of the roots or lower stems of infected plants... Where resistance is not available, control is achieved through rotations with non-host crops, adjusting time of sowing in relation to the break of the season and weed kill, improved tillage techniques and by ensuring that adequate nutrition is available to help the plants recover...
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