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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Ascochyta confirmed in CQ chickpea crop.. Dr Moore urged growers to vigilantly monitor crops for early signs of Ascochyta blight infection, particularly given above average winter rain in many areas and the Bureau of Meteorology's forecast of neutral to La Ni a climate conditions by spring for northern Australia... "BGM could present more of a threat to crops this season than Ascochyta with the mild, wet conditions in winter producing high biomass crops and this, coupled with a wet spring will favour BGM."..
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI) senior plant pathologist Dr Kevin Moore says current forecasts for above average winter rain and neutral to La Ni a conditions in spring, plus evidence that the ascochyta blight fungus is changing and concerns about varietal purity, justify a conservative approach to ascochyta management this season... Chickpea growers in Queensland and New South Wales are being urged to take a proactive approach to disease management strategies this season in response to an updated climate outlook for winter and spring 2016... Recent forecasts issued by the Bureau of Meteorology suggest an increased likelihood of above average winter rain and the onset of neutral to La Ni a climate conditions by spring for northern Australia...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Controlling Phytophthora root rot (PRR) in chickpea crops is a two-step process, says Dr Kevin Moore, a plant pathologist from the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (DPI) in Tamworth... In a paper presented at the March GRDC Research Update in Goondiwindi, Queensland, Dr Moore emphasised that although there are no in-crop control measures for PRR, there are two steps that reduce the risk of damage... Dr Moore leads the chickpea component of a GRDC-funded research project that includes investigating the effects of PRR on commercial chickpea varieties, advanced breeding lines and hybrids with wild relatives of chickpea...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Dr Moore says growers should be aware of the disease resistance traits of each variety they are growing and have seed tested for germination, vigour and pathogens... "The first thing growers of any crop should do is make sure they've got good quality planting seed because getting crops off to a good start is dependent on the quality of the seed," Dr Moore said... Dr Moore says the resurgence indicates growers are confident about the place the crop has in the farming system and they are equally confident about growing chickpeas...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Dr Moore says growers should be aware of the disease resistance traits of each variety they are growing and have seed tested for germination, vigour and pathogens... "The first thing growers of any crop should do is make sure they've got good quality planting seed because getting crops off to a good start is dependent on the quality of the seed," Dr Moore said... Dr Moore says the resurgence indicates growers are confident about the place the crop has in the farming system and they are equally confident about growing chickpeas...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Dr Andrew James, leader of the breeding program, says: "Not only will Richmond yield more than A6785 [eight per cent more, on average] it will also provide grain growers in traditional soybean-growing areas in northern NSW and southern Queensland with better quality grain with higher protein.".. Thanks to its high biomass [25 per cent higher than A6785] and grain protein [up to five per cent higher] it will become a silage favourite with dairy farmers in northern NSW, and will allow sugarcane growers the option to harvest high-quality grain instead of just growing soybeans for green manure," Dr James says... "Compared with current soybean varieties, both Richmond and Hayman will be able to withstand an extra few days of rain at harvest time, which growers along the coast will welcome, as well as inland growers who have been affected by the very wet years recently," Dr Moore says...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
The Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) is warning chickpea growers to closely monitor crops for ascochyta blight infection this season to minimise the risk of yield loss... "All varieties, including PBA HatTrick , should be sprayed with a registered ascochyta fungicide prior to the first rain event after crop emergence, three weeks after emergence, or at the 3 branch stage of crop development, whichever occurs first," Dr Moore said... "In localities where ascochyta was found on any variety in 2014, inoculum will be present in paddocks intended for chickpeas in 2015; volunteer chickpeas in 2014 chickpea paddocks are already infected with ascochyta and these provide additional inoculum for 2015 crops...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
The Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) is warning chickpea growers to closely monitor crops for ascochyta blight infection this season to minimise the risk of yield loss... New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI) senior plant pathologist Dr Kevin Moore said areas where ascochyta was found last year are considered high risk for 2015 crops and he urged growers to implement a fungicide management program... "All varieties, including PBA HatTrick , should be sprayed with a registered ascochyta fungicide prior to the first rain event after crop emergence, three weeks after emergence, or at the 3 branch stage of crop development, whichever occurs first," Dr Moore said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Ascochyta blight has reared its head in chickpea crops in parts of northern and north central New South Wales, prompting a warning to chickpea growers and consultants to be on the lookout for the disease... Although purity and/or correctness of the variety identification still need to be ascertained, Dr Moore urged growers to submit samples of any crop where Ascochyta blight is suspected... Samples should be wrapped in newspaper or paper towel and placed into an express post envelope (the plastic ones); ideally sent on a Monday or Tuesday not Thursday or Friday as they may be rotten after sitting in the post over the weekend; if needs be, samples can be stored in a fridge over the weekend before sending...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Dr Kevin Moore, NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI) special plant pathologist (pulses and oilseeds), Tamworth, NSW says many 2011 chickpea crops had problems with establishment and seedling disease... "More than half the seed lots were infected with Botrytis and 89 per cent were colonised by other fungi," Dr Moore said... Dr Moore presented the findings to growers and agronomists at the recent round of Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Updates and said the work highlighted the importance of proper seed treatment...
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