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stubble grazing

Catalogue: Ground Cover
Dr Neil Fettell checks stored soil water with a neutron probe at Condobolin, NSW - By Nicole Baxter.. Dr Hunt says the extra water in the ungrazed treatments was stored deeper in the profile, which suggests the difference resulted from improved infiltration rather than reduced evaporation... In summary, Dr Fettell says the results from the two trials support earlier research and suggest that stubble is most beneficial where the summer rainfall intensity is high, unstable soil surface structure results in low infiltration rates and slopes are enough to encourage runoff...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Dr Neil Fettell, University of New England (UNE) and NSW Department of Primary Industries (NSW DPI), and Ian Menz, NSW DPI have investigated the impact of grazing on soil properties, water dynamics and crop yield in a no-till, controlled-traffic system... The eight treatments are each replicated four times and the variables are: grazing intensity using adult sheep (nil, moderate or heavy); stubble amount (as is, or added or removed depending on the season); and weed control (all herbicide or partly reliant on grazing)... Dr Fettell says the results from the two trials support earlier research and suggest that stubble is most beneficial where the summer rainfall intensity is high, unstable soil surface structure results in low infiltration rates and slopes are enough to encourage runoff...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Retain about 70 per cent ground cover, or two tonnes per hectare of cereal stubble cover, to ensure crop yields are not affected in 2014.. To assess stubble load, for every 1t/ha of grain yield about 1.5 to 2.5t/ha of cereal stubble will be left as residue.. Overgrazing stubbles reduces paddock coverage; reducing a soil's ability to store moisture while also increasing the risk of erosion...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Sowing a susceptible wheat variety on stubble of a previously infected susceptible variety (e.g. Gregory-on-Gregory) represents a much higher risk for developing high levels of yellow spot... The incidence and severity of yellow spot increases as moisture periods lengthen such that it takes repeated rain events to drive the disease from the lower to the upper canopy later in the season... Yellow spot is generally considered a significant disease in very wet seasons (e.g. 1998 and 2010) where yield losses of up to 30% have been recorded in susceptible wheat varieties...
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