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fallow weeds

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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Research funded by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) shows that early control of fallow weeds can lead to significant increases in the levels of stored plant-available water and increased availability of nutrients (especially nitrogen), benefiting crop yield and grain quality... Mr Cameron, who co-authored the GRDC's Summer Fallow Weed Management manual, said soil water saved by killing fallow weeds was often stored deep in the profile and its value is often far higher than that of in-crop rainfall... In the right soil, deep stored soil water can have a water use efficiency of up to 60 kilograms of grain/millimetre of stored water...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Herbicide control of fleabane is difficult because it has a natural tolerance to herbicide uptake and is often targeted over summer when plants are well established and spray conditions are not favourable... In southern New South Wales it emerges through winter and early spring, whereas recent studies have found that populations from South Australia emerge as late as August to November, provided moisture is not limiting (see Figure 1)... The impact of fleabane control on stored soil moisture was also assessed in April for a selection of treatments at Bute and Pinnaroo (Figure 3.)...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
The use of Group A herbicides in fallow to control grass weeds such as the Chloris species - feathertop Rhodes grass (Chloris virgata) and windmill grass (Chloris truncata) - have shown to be a viable option for controlling young weeds... Recent research has investigated the use of some of these herbicides for fallow applications to control grass weeds, in particular the Chloris species - feathertop Rhodes grass (Chloris virgata) and windmill grass (C. truncata)... Trial results have shown that a minimum period of 5 to 7 days should occur between applications...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Small, early tillering weeds should be the target of Group A herbicides; these herbicides are less effective when weed size increases.. Many northern growers are now dealing with grass weeds in fallow that are not well controlled by glyphosate, with grower feedback indicating that alternative solutions to control these weeds are required... Research by the GRDC-funded Grower Solutions Groups has demonstrated that the use of Group A herbicides in fallow can be a viable option to control young grass weeds in certain situations...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Dry summer sparks concern over planting options.. The label states that wheat (except for varieties with Clearfield technology), barley, lucerne and chickpea can be planted four months after application and faba beans three months after application... "The label also requires that for following crops of wheat (other than Clearfield varieties), barley and lucerne, Flame should not be applied in fallow later than the end of December and shouldn't be applied if rainfall from spraying to sowing of cereals is expected to be less than 200mm," Mr Congreve said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
A new online resource is a good first 'port of call' for Western Australian growers seeking information about managing summer weeds, which are currently widespread... Growers know that weeds allowed to grow during a fallow will use available soil water, use soil nitrogen and add seeds to the seed bank, increasing weed pressure and control costs in following seasons... The Hot Topic includes information to assist them in best managing summer weeds, including herbicide timing and how to maximise the performance of double-knock applications...
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