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dry sowing

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Catalogue: GRDC Media
His trials at Dalwallinu, Merredin and Mullewa in 2012 and 2013 demonstrated that some wheat varieties could establish well when sown to a depth of 70-100mm... But establishment across all sites was reduced by between 17 and 61 per cent with deep sowing, compared to establishment from a sowing depth of 50mm (especially in varieties with short coleoptiles and on loamy soil)... At the North Miling site, establishment was similar for shallow (28mm) and 'normal' (52mm) sowing depths, but deep sowing to a depth of 119mm reduced establishment by between 22 and 45 per cent for a range of wheat varieties...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
His trials at Dalwallinu, Merredin and Mullewa in 2012 and 2013 demonstrated that some wheat varieties could establish well when sown to a depth of 70-100mm... But establishment across all sites was reduced by between 17 and 61 per cent with deep sowing, compared to establishment from a sowing depth of 50mm (especially in varieties with short coleoptiles and on loamy soil)... At the North Miling site, establishment was similar for shallow (28mm) and 'normal' (52mm) sowing depths, but deep sowing to a depth of 119mm reduced establishment by between 22 and 45 per cent for a range of wheat varieties...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Dry sowing wheat in April can help to optimise farm yields, increase farm area sown and reduce the risks of later season heat shocks across much of WA without significantly affecting frost risk... Less is known about the effects of dry sowing on wheat yields when there are early season soil water deficits... Dr Fletcher found the risk of heat shock fell from 25 to 14 per cent when wheat was sown dry, mainly due to a tighter and earlier flowering window compared to wet sowing of wheat...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Sowing opportunities were assessed for each day in the sowing season based on PASW% of seedbed [0-100mm depth] or topsoil [0-200mm depth]... Seedling performance was assessed for each sowing opportunity by counting the days between germination (dry sown) or sowing (moist sown) and July 19 when seedlings were exposed to lethal or disabling topsoil [0-200mm] conditions ( Table 1 )... In 50% of years the first opportunity occurs before early May and 10 days of sowing will have been achieved by early June ( Table 3 )...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (West)
Spread of flowering dates of dry sown crops can be successfully achieved through varietal choice and adjusting sowing order of the wet sown crop according to the flowering prediction of the dry sown crop... The aim of this paper is to discuss possibility of using varietal differences in phenology mechanisms to achieve a desired spread of flowering dates after dry sowing... The data were used to estimate: 1) spread for flowering dates of varieties across germination dates, 2) the range of achievable variation through varieties for given sowing dates...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates
Whilst there is anecdotal evidence to suggest that dry seeding has been widely adopted in Western Australia, especially in the lower rainfall agronomic zones, the extent and management of dry seeding are not well documented, particularly for wheat crops... The aims of the paper are to determine the extent of dry seeding across the agro-ecological zones of the Western Australian Wheatbelt, to uncover the trends of adoption by soil types, rainfall and crop species and to define the management practices and gaps in knowledge around the risks of dry seeding crops in Western Australia... In the paper results for dry sowing adoption and farmers perception of risk are presented...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (West)
For dry sowing, the maximum allowable rainfall was estimated at about 5 mm for sandy, 8 mm for loamy and 10 mm for clayey textured soils, failing which a day or two after the rain (depending evaporation rate) should be allowed before dry seeding... We used two years data, a literature review and common knowledge on soil-plant water relations to estimate the maximum allowable and minimum required rainfall in order to successfully avail a dry or a wet sowing opportunity, respectively... Seedling mortality per day was calculated as percentage of the maximum emerged counts...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (West)
Seedling performance was assessed for each sowing opportunity by counting the days between germination (dry sown) or sowing (moist sown) and July 19 when seedlings were exposed to lethal or disabling topsoil [0-200mm] conditions (Table 1)... In 50% of years the first opportunity occurs before late April-early May and 10 days of sowing have been achieved by mid-late May. Exposure to disabling water deficits is more frequent and of longer duration than moist-wet seedbed sowings whilst exposure to lethal deficits is similar (sand) or slightly reduced (loamy duplex soil)... Exposure to water deficit 2 1 Dry sowing: start 10 April, water deficit assessed after germination day 2 Moist sowing: start 20 April, water deficit assessed after sowing day 3 Gd10, date of germination following 10 days of dry sowing..
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Research shows benefits of dry sowing wheat early.. Crop modelling work shows that dry sowing wheat in April can maximise whole-farm yields in Western Australia and minimise the likelihood of late-season heat stress, without significantly affecting frost risk... "Using data from 54 seasons at seven sites across the WA grainbelt, the modelling work shows farm-level yield benefits of up to 35 per cent - or up to 0.5 to 1.2 tonnes per hectare - from dry seeding wheat before autumn rains, compared with wet sowing wheat after autumn rains," he said...
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