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cultivar resistance

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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Canola growers can reduce potential yield losses and the probability of blackleg disease resistance breakdown occurring by changing cultivars every three years... That's according to blackleg authority Steve Marcroft who says sowing the same cultivar every year is likely to break the cultivar's resistance to blackleg - the most severe disease of canola in Australia... Speaking at recent Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) grains research Updates throughout the southern cropping region, Dr Marcroft has told growers and advisers that every year a cultivar is sown from the same resistance group, the number of virulent isolates that can attack that particular cultivar increases...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Author : Sharon Watt Oilseeds disease authority Dr Steve Marcroft says severe early blackleg disease infection in 2016 could be attributed to the combination of three factors - wet weather, breakdown of cultivar resistance and the onset of fungicide resistance... A combination of factors has led to severe early infection of blackleg disease in this year's canola crops in southern Australia (South Australia, Victoria and southern New South Wales)... "Normally with blackleg we tell farmers to monitor their crops at end of season to see how much stem canker they have - it's quite unusual for the disease to be striking young crops so severely at this time of the year," said Dr Marcroft, whose research is supported by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC)...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
WESTERN, NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN REGIONS QUANTIFY THE RISK, PADDOCK BY PADDOCK Blackleg can cause severe yield loss, but can be successfully managed... If you have: high or increasing levels of blackleg in your crop (from monitoring disease levels each year); used the management practices outlined in Step 3; and sown cultivars from the same resistance group in close proximity (within 2km) for three or more years, then sow a cultivar from a different resistance group (see page 4 - Blackleg Resistance Groups)... To facilitate the process, all cultivars have been placed into groups (A to H) based on their resistance genes inTable 3...
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Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
WESTERN, NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN REGIONS QUANTIFY THE RISK, PADDOCK BY PADDOCK Blackleg can cause severe yield loss, but can be successfully managed... If you have: high or increasing levels of blackleg in your crop (from monitoring disease levels each year); used the management practices outlined in Step 3; and sown cultivars from the same resistance group in close proximity (within 2km) for three or more years, then sow a cultivar from a different resistance group (see page 4 - Blackleg Resistance Groups)... To facilitate the process, all cultivars have been placed into groups (A to H) based on their resistance genes inTable 3...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Canola growers can reduce potential yield losses and the probability of blackleg disease resistance breakdown occurring by changing cultivars every three years... That's according to blackleg authority Steve Marcroft who says sowing the same cultivar every year is likely to break the cultivar's resistance to blackleg - the most severe disease of canola in Australia... Speaking at recent Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) grains research Updates throughout the southern cropping region, Dr Marcroft has told growers and advisers that every year a cultivar is sown from the same resistance group, the number of virulent isolates that can attack that particular cultivar increases...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
WESTERN, NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN REGIONS QUANTIFY THE RISK, PADDOCK BY PADDOCK Blackleg can cause severe yield loss, but can be successfully managed... If you have: high or increasing levels of blackleg in your crop (from monitoring disease levels each year); used the management practices outlined in Step 3; and sown cultivars from the same resistance group in close proximity (within 2km) for three or more years, then sow a cultivar from a different resistance group (see page 4 - Blackleg Resistance Groups)... To facilitate the process, all cultivars have been placed into groups (A to H) based on their resistance genes inTable 3...
Related categories:
Catalogue: GRDC Factsheets
WESTERN, NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN REGIONS QUANTIFY THE RISK, PADDOCK BY PADDOCK Blackleg can cause severe yield loss, but can be successfully managed... If you have: high or increasing levels of blackleg in your crop (from monitoring disease levels each year); used the management practices outlined in Step 3; and sown cultivars from the same resistance group in close proximity (within 2km) for three or more years, then sow a cultivar from a different resistance group (see page 4 - Blackleg Resistance Groups)... To facilitate the process, all cultivars have been placed into groups (A to H) based on their resistance genes inTable 3...
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