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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Raised beds need on-farm water plans.. Late-season waterlogging events have been rare in the six years since Tim Johnston, a soil and water research scientist with the Department of Primary Industries, Victoria (DPI), started assessing the environmental impacts of water and nutrient losses from raised beds... Mr Johnston says the reduced runoff from raised beds is the result of improved soil structure under the bed, leading to increased water holding capacity of the soil and greater water use by the crop...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
The Kirkwood family at Kendenup, WA, have combined no-till with raised beds to lift their high-rainfall cropping regime... [Photo by Brad Collis: Chris Kirkwood and his mother Marlene: the stress of changing a whole farm system is offset by the sense of excitement, says Chris].. Chris says the challenges that come from a system change are immense, but much of the stress is offset by a sense of excitement that comes from realising there is a large knowledge bank that the industry still has not tapped...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
Grain growers using raised bed systems in Australia's high rainfall zone (HRZ) stand to benefit financially and environmentally from better management of water and nutrients on-farm... A Victoria Department of Primary Industries (DPIV) research scientist has found that farmers can potentially reduce their application of fertiliser by 30 per cent in raised bed systems, saving money and minimising the amount of nutrients lost in runoff... Mr Johnston expects a resurgence in raised bed cropping as high rainfall zones return to a more predictable wet weather pattern, and says it's critical that farmers comply with best practice methods to make the economic gains and minimise their effect on the environment...
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Catalogue: GRDC Final Reports
The main findings were that raised beds provided improved drainage and were consistently drier than conventional cropping... In 2003 wheat grew better on the conventional cultivation than the raised beds, a difference that continued through to harvest when significantly greater grain yield was measured on the conventional cultivation (6.9 t/ha)... The findings from the project provide additional knowledge of the key soil physical properties, together with crop yields, on raised beds compared with cropping on conventional cultivation and pasture in south-western Victoria...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Photo of David and Tracey Langley inspecting their wheat.. Based at Winchelsea, in southern Victoria, they began cropping grain on two-metre beds in 1995, and David says the transition increased yields across their holdings by at least 40 per cent... David says that given how wet the furrows can become, the regular wheels had a slippage, and fuel wastage, of about 10 per cent...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Raised beds exemplify on-farm adaptation.. Bruce says grower confidence in the raised-bed concept was drawn from lessons learnt in Geelong at South Roxby on former agricultural land where Southern Farming Systems (SFS) established its first trial site... Wheat yields were found to increase slightly on the 20m raised beds; the plants matured unevenly, were difficult to harvest and the wider beds were more expensive to form, Bruce says...
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Catalogue: Ground Cover
Raised beds exemplify on-farm adaptation.. Bruce says grower confidence in the raised-bed concept was drawn from lessons learnt in Geelong at South Roxby on former agricultural land where Southern Farming Systems (SFS) established its first trial site... Wheat yields were found to increase slightly on the 20m raised beds; the plants matured unevenly, were difficult to harvest and the wider beds were more expensive to form, Bruce says...
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Catalogue: GRDC Media
A joint Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) and Victoria Department of Primary Industries (DPI) study in southwest Victoria found that growers could potentially reduce fertiliser application rates by up to 30 per cent through better fertiliser management on raised beds, and quantified the amount of runoff likely from significant rain events... While the drought meant some farmers reverted to traditional flat cropping, DPI researcher Tim Johnston says he expects raised bed systems to experience resurgence at the end of the winter cropping season, when farmers have time to consider their management, drainage and machinery options... "Application rates for topdressed nitrogen fertiliser can be reduced by up to 30pc by placing it on top of raised beds and not in the furrows, and this has environmental as well as economic benefits by potentially reducing nutrient losses in runoff," Mr Johnston said...
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Catalogue: GRDC Updates (West)
Mention of a trade name or company in this publication does not imply endorsement of any product or company by the Department of Agriculture... I was educated by a group of farmers at Varley in 1982, to the importance of Crop Updates is a partnership between the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia and the Grains Research & Development Corporation 22.. Advisers and consultants should highlight the management options available to their clients, do sensitivity analyses which in effect, tell the client 'what happens to production, quality and profitability, if he chooses a certain management option ' and show how that changes with input levels, season, soil type, prices going up/down, etc...
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